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Subject: 'out of' vs. 'off of'
Question: Why do you get ''out'' of a chair, but ''off'' of a sofa, bench, etc.? Is is
just a colloquialism, or is there a root cause? Conversely, you sit ''in''
a chair, but ''on'' a bech, sofa, stool, etc.

Reply: I concur with Prof. Pyatt's judgment; I would sit ON a chair if it had no arms and/or
had a hard seat, like a dining room chair. There's an interesting difference between
lying IN a bed and lying ON a bed; if you're IN the bed, you're under the covers, but if
you're ON the bed, you're on top of the covers.

Reply From: Susan D Fischer      click here to access email
 
Date: 03-Oct-2012
 
Other Replies:
  1. Re: 'out of' vs. 'off of'    Geoffrey Richard Sampson     (15-Oct-2012)
  2. Re: 'out of' vs. 'off of'    Elizabeth J Pyatt     (03-Oct-2012)
  3. Re: 'out of' vs. 'off of'    Anthea Fraser Gupta     (04-Oct-2012)

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