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Subject: Greek Babbling
Question: When infants begin babbling, the first sounds after vowels are usually
the stops. First of those are the labials. Because they are very
productive in world languages, [b], [p], and [d] are usually the first. In
Greek, [b] and [d] are infrequent phones. In fact, there are no letters
for these phones; instead, combinations are made: μπ for [b] and ντ
for [d]. Does this mean, then, that Greek babies, when they begin
babbling, do not begin with the sounds [b] and [d]? And if they do, is
that just further proof that much of language acquisition is innate and
there is some sort of Universal Grammar?

From: John Damianos
Date: 30-Oct-2012
Replies:
  1. Re: Greek Babbling    Madalena Cruz-Ferreira     (31-Oct-2012)
  2. Re: Greek Babbling    Elizabeth J Pyatt     (31-Oct-2012)
  3. Re: Greek Babbling    Anthea Fraser Gupta     (01-Nov-2012)
  4. Re: Greek Babbling    Geoffrey Richard Sampson     (31-Oct-2012)
  5. Re: Greek Babbling    James L Fidelholtz     (01-Nov-2012)

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