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Subject: Alternative Verb Conjugations
Question: I am looking for examples of two alternative sets of verb conjugations for the same tense, aspect, or mood that co-exist in a language. As an example, modern Spanish has two distinct conjugations for the imperfect subjunctive. The older conjugation ends in -se and comes from Latin's pluperfect subjunctive. The newer conjugation ends in -ra and comes from Latin's pluperfect indicative. The -ra set is more popular in the spoken language but -se is still used in written Spanish, and I have occasionally heard it spoken. There are some minor differences in usage but when it comes to the primary functions of the imperfect subjunctive, -se and -ra are interchangeable. Do you know of other examples? Thanks, Judy Hochberg, Fordham University
Reply: The development of the dental preterite in Proto-Germanic, coexisting with the PIE ablaut verb forms would be another example. Unfortunately we have no evidence as the the socio-linguistic context of this early development.
Reply From: Herbert Frederic Stahlke      click here to access email
 
Date: 10-Jun-2013
 
Other Replies:
  1. Re: Alternative Verb Conjugations    Henrik Joergensen     (10-Jun-2013)
  2. Re: Alternative Verb Conjugations    Elizabeth J Pyatt     (10-Jun-2013)
  3. Re: Alternative Verb Conjugations    Geoffrey Richard Sampson     (10-Jun-2013)
  4. Re: Alternative Verb Conjugations    James L Fidelholtz     (10-Jun-2013)

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