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"Buenos dias", "buenas noches" -- this was the first words in a foreign language I heard in my life, as a three-year old boy growing up in developing post-war Western Germany, where the first gastarbeiters had arrived from Spain. Fascinated by the strange sounds, I tried to get to know some more languages, the only opportunity being TV courses of English and French -- there was no foreign language education for pre-teen school children in Germany yet in those days. Read more



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Subject: 'Cheers' as a synonym for 'Hello'
Question: In reading Peter Trudgill's ''On Dialect'' I was surprised to come
across an assertion that 'cheers' could be a substitute for
'hello.' As a native speaker of British English (West Sussex) I
have never heard of 'cheers' as a greeting. It has only ever meant
'thanks' or a way to sign off an informal email (but even then
only to replace 'thanks' as well as a toast. I have asked several
people from different regions and ages and they were all equally
surprised.

Would anyone care to offer an explanation or evidence of
Trudgill's statement?

Reply: Seems to me that Trudgill made a mistake, or the copy-editor or
publisher did. As a native speaker of American English who is by
genealogy as well as sympathy an 'anglophone', I've neither heard
nor used "cheers" in any context other than as a closing sign-off.
(this would be where I would have written "cheers" save for the
oddity of the topic.
Reply From: Harry A. Whitaker      click here to access email
 
Date: 19-Dec-2013
 
Other Replies:
  1. Re: 'Cheers' as a synonym for 'Hello'    Elizabeth J Pyatt     (19-Dec-2013)
  2. Re: 'Cheers' as a synonym for 'Hello'    Geoffrey Richard Sampson     (19-Dec-2013)

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