Featured Linguist!

Jost Gippert: Our Featured Linguist!

"Buenos dias", "buenas noches" -- this was the first words in a foreign language I heard in my life, as a three-year old boy growing up in developing post-war Western Germany, where the first gastarbeiters had arrived from Spain. Fascinated by the strange sounds, I tried to get to know some more languages, the only opportunity being TV courses of English and French -- there was no foreign language education for pre-teen school children in Germany yet in those days. Read more



Donate Now | Visit the Fund Drive Homepage

Amount Raised:

$34674

Still Needed:

$40326

Can anyone overtake Syntax in the Subfield Challenge ?

Grad School Challenge Leader: University of Washington


Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


E-mail this page

Conference Information



Full Title: Modality and Implicated Evaluation

      
Location: Perpignan, France
Start Date: 28-Sep-2013 - 28-Sep-2013
Contact: Olivier Simonin
Meeting Email: click here to access email
Meeting URL: http://vect.univ-perp.fr/crbst_60.html
Meeting Description: A one-day symposium on Modality and implicated evaluation (a posteriori modalization) will be held at the University of Perpignan - Via Domitia on Friday, 27 September 2013, with the support of the research laboratories VECT - Mare Nostrum (Université de Perpignan) and CRIDAF (Paris 13).

The main focus of the symposium will be on modality and implicated evaluation - subjective, appreciative meanings connected to the expression of modality. Of particular interest will be instances in which speakers comment on (root/epistemic) modal judgments expressed while it is understood that the state-of-affairs (/situation) has been actualized or is counterfactual (i.e. when dealing with a posteriori modalization or ‘retrospective’ modality). Why should some modal meaning be expressed - modality pertaining to potentiality and uncertainty - while it is obvious that the state-of-affairs has been actualized or is counterfactual? Both possibilities can be illustrated with two textbook examples: To think he had to break a leg! ; You’re very lucky, you might have been killed. The basic modal notions of necessity and possibility are arguably to be found here, but they are used in such a way as to enable the speaker to convey additional, evaluative/appreciative meaning.

The connection between (implicated) evaluation, modality and this type of context might be used as a starting point for analysis, although this is not fully required for the symposium.

Guest speakers: Pierre Cotte; Paul Larreya

Larreya, Paul. 2009. Towards a typology of modality in language, in: R. Salkie, P. Busuttil, J. van der Auwera. Modality in English: Theory and Description, 9-30. (excerpts are available from Googlebooks)
Linguistic Subfield: Semantics
LL Issue: 24.865


Back
Calls and Conferences main page