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Conference Information



Full Title: Here and Elsewhere in Translated Literature

      
Location: Arras, France
Start Date: 21-May-2015 - 22-May-2015
Contact: Corinne Wecksteen-Quinio
Meeting Email: click here to access email
Meeting URL: http://axecotralis.wordpress.com/call-for-papers-international-conference-here-and-elsewhere-in-translated-literature/
Meeting Description: The « Textes et Cultures » Research Centre at the Université d’Artois (Arras, France) is pleased to invite papers for its international conference, “Here and Elsewhere in Translated Literature,” to be held on May 21-22, 2015.

The aim of this conference is to explore how the Elsewhere is depicted in translated literature (what sort of images are represented, how and why they are altered in the target text, etc.) as well as the role of translation in the transfer of images across cultures, bearing in mind that the concept of “images” is a multifaceted one, since it can be understood as the way a culture is represented or can be linked to imagery, figures of speech or metaphors.

Literature is first and foremost a place where writers and readers meet on various levels—involving language, emotions, imagery and imagination. Through translation, literature may aspire to be the link between the writer and the universal reader. Images conveyed in literary works Here may succeed in taking on an aspect related to Elsewhere. The aim of this conference is to explore how the Elsewhere is depicted in translated literature as well as the role of translation in the transfer of images across cultures. The concept of “images” is a multifaceted one:

- On the one hand it may refer to the way a culture is represented. What sort of images from Elsewhere are represented in translated literature? Are they identical to the ones used in the original works? Is there a cultural and social influence on the way these images are altered? Besides, on the reception side, how are translated images perceived by the reader? To what extent does translation contribute to or hinder transcultural exchanges?

- On the other hand there can be a more stylistic approach, if “image” is linked to imagery, figures of speech or metaphors. What becomes of imagery in translated works? How are literary metaphors conveyed across different cultures? Should the Foreign, the Other, the imagery from Elsewhere be kept, or should it be domesticated to fit the culture prevailing Here? Contributors may address translation difficulties, successes or failures.
Linguistic Subfield: Translation; Ling & Literature
LL Issue: 25.2734


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