Institute for Language Information and Technology, ILIT
Eastern Michigan University EMU HOME
 

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Presentations



2012

  • October 19
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    "Dynamic Professional Content Corpora and New Technologies" with Dr. Damir Ćavar (Department of Linguistics at Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Wayne State University.
    The Institute for Language Information and Technology (ILIT) at EMU is engaged in the creation of an infrastructure for a variety of corpus types that is based on freely available or self-developed components that are made available to the community. The LINGUIST List corpus (LLC) for example is a continuously growing mailing list corpus that contains professional linguistic content. The data from other professional mailing lists that focus on specific linguistic topics and are archived at ILIT should be integrated into a larger corpus of professional linguistic content as well. Large collections of texts in many languages that are made available at the Project Gutenberg are being added to a specific Gutenberg corpus. In general, our goal is to provide resources and an infrastructure for other collections of texts from various languages. In this presentation we will describe the goals and motivation for the corpus infrastructure project. We present the processes of corpus creation and maintenance that is based on common encoding and annotation standards as for example TEI XML P5, and linguistic analysis and annotation using available or self-developed natural language processing components. We discuss experiments with new types of storage and retrieval infrastructure, using common indexing strategies based on open source systems like Lucene, the Philologic online corpus application, or alternative approaches for indexing and visualization of linguistic information and corpus analysis results that make use of NoSQL storage systems.

  • August 17-24
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    "Participant in Workshop on Sociolinguistic Documentation in Sub-Saharan Africa" with Anna Belew (The LINGUIST List) . Location: University of Buea, Buea, Cameroon.
    Relatively little attention has been paid to understanding what kinds of documentary products are required to adequately capture the sociolinguistic setting of a language. This represents a particularly complex issue in the highly multilingual contexts that typically characterize Sub-Saharan Africa. The guiding concern of this workshop is understanding how we can adequately document the sociolinguistic contexts of Sub-Saharan African languages; the workshop is designed to produce new research collaborations among scholars of African languages. Significant time will be devoted to working groups where participants will divide into sub-groups to discuss specific issues related to the sociolinguistic documentation of Sub-Saharan African languages and draft reports proposing future documentary agendas. Anna Belew attended the conference as a participant in the Workshop on Sociolinguistic Documentation in Sub-Saharan Africa which was held in conjunction with the 7th World Conference of African Linguistics.

  • May 8
    "Sprachtechnologie und Sprachdokumentation: Eine Darstellung von Projekten des Heimatinstituts der LINGUIST List" with Dr. Damir Ćavar (Department of Linguistics at Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Das Institut für Deutsche Sprache, Mannheim, Germany.
    Das Institut für Sprachliche Information und Technologie (Institute of Language Information and Technology, ILIT) an der Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti entwickelt seit vielen Jahren Werkzeuge und bietet Dienstleistungen an, die der nachhaltigen Sprachdokumentation dienen. Weltweit bekannt ist das Institut als Heimat der LINGUIST List, dem größten linguistischen Informationssystem im World Wide Web. Damir Ćavar berichtet in seinem Vortrag am IDS über die Geschichte der LINGUIST List und über aktuelle Projekte am ILIT.

    Translation: For many years, the Institute for Language Information and Technology (ILIT) at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti has been developing tools and offering services that serve sustainable language documentation. Known worldwide as the home of the Institute LINGUIST List, it is the largest linguistic information system on the World Wide Web. Damir Ćavar reported in his lecture on the history of the LINGUIST List's current projects and ILIT to the IDS (Institut für Deutsche Sprache).

  • May 4-5
    "Bootstrapping NLP and MT Resources for Under-Resourced Languages" with Dr. Damir Ćavar (Department of Linguistics at Eastern Michigan University) . Location: University of Hamburg, Germany.
    Dr. Damir Ćavar presented at the conference entitled "Crosslingual Language Technology in service of an integrated multilingual Europe - 20 years on."

  • April 20
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    "Resonant Voice Therapy: Clinical Applications for Vocal Hoarseness" with Christy Bird (Speech-Language Pathology at Eastern Michigan University) . Location: 202 Porter, Eastern Michigan University.
    Vocal hoarseness (dysphonia) affects nearly one-third of the population at some point in their lifetime. Because of its prevalence, Speech-Language Pathologists should be familiar with best practices regarding its treatment. Experts recommend a combination of vocal hygiene education, medical management when necessary (e.g., reflux, allergy, or asthma medication, surgical interventions), and voice therapy that addresses respiration, phonation, and resonance. These recommendations echo Stemple and Fry’s (2010) “Eclectic Voice Therapy”, which advocates combining a variety of treatment approaches to best suit a client’s needs. To address resonance, Resonant Voice Therapy (RVT) (also called Lessac-Madsen Resonant Voice Therapy or LMRVT) may be utilized in the treatment of vocal hoarseness. It has been shown to be effective in isolation and in an Eclectic Voice Therapy context. This case study follows the progress of a 53-year old male experiencing vocal hoarseness following heart surgery with ventilation, and provides further support for the use of Resonant Voice Therapy in combination with other approaches, specifically vocal hygiene education, reflux precautions, and voice therapy to address phonation and respiration.

  • March 26
    "Compliance vs. Security: Is it Money Well Spent?" with Flora Du (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List), Steven Aiello (Eastern Michigan University), Professor Brad Wilkerson (School of Technology Studies at Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Student Center, Eastern Michigan University.
    In today's IT and business world, there is a need for transparency and control. The current trend in government and business space is to achieve a sense of control over complex environments through compliance standards. These compliance standards can be government-imposed or business sector-based. These processes are time-consuming and costly for many businesses. So we need to post the question: Do compliance initiatives actually accomplish the intended goals? We wish to examine this question to see if these compliance standards truly provide a benefit.

  • March 26
    "The Ezafat Suffix in Farsi: A Morphosyntactic Analysis" with Ahmed Saeed Manati (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List), Dr. T. Daniel Seely (Department of Linguistics at Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Student Center, Eastern Michigan University.
    The Ezafat suffix '-e/ye' is an important part of Farsi noun phrases, adjective phrases, and prepositional phrases. More importantly, a noun phrase cannot form a constituent without the Ezafat Suffix. Its occurrence is syntactically motivated by the presence of a following right-branching modifier or complement within the phrase, and it significantly contributes to the semantics of the phrases in which it is used. I provide an introduction to the underlying structure of the suffix and an analysis of its behavior, and I attempt to determine its precise role in the mapping from underlying form to surface form, within generative syntax. This provides insights about an aspect of Farsi syntax in particular, and about syntactic theory more generally.

  • March 26
    "Gender distinctions in English manner-of-speaking verbs" with Brent Miller (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List), Dr. Veronica Grondona (Department of Linguistics at Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Student Center, Eastern Michigan University.
    This paper explores gender distinctions in English manner-of-speaking verbs and describes the results of a study conducted to gauge the extent to which each verb connotes inherent gender, if such inherent gender exists. The results of the study show that the inherent stereotypical gender of a subject greatly influences respondents' choice of which verb best completes a sentence. Participants' responses also indicate that certain manner-of-speaking verbs are exclusively female and that stereotypically male verbs of this type may not exist.

  • March 26
    "Cyrillic Graphization of Dungan" with Brent Woo (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List), Dr. Veronica Grondona (Department of Linguistics at Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Student Center, Eastern Michigan University.
    The Dungans have been investigated thoroughly from geographical, sociological, anthropological, and even biological perspectives. But there has not yet been a detailed analysis with a sociolinguistic focus. This study aims to fill that gap. The Dungan people speak a Sino-Tibetan language that resembles northwestern Mandarin dialects of the Chinese macrolanguage, but in sociolinguistic terms the language, and consequently the people, are not regarded as, nor do they self-identify as, Chinese. This study discusses why language is so important to the Dungans, with particular emphasis on the Cyrillic writing system. Presented here is an analysis based on Haarman's (2008) idea of Graphization, the process of adoption of a writing system for a given language. Despite heavy influence from language contact on all sides—the surrounding Central Asian languages and the Russian language—the Dungans maintain the independent identity of their language.

  • March 2
    "Gender distinctions in English manner-of-speaking verbs" with Brent Miller (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List) . Location: Michigan Academy of Science, Arts, & Letters, Alma College, Alma, Michigan.
    This paper explored gender distinctions in English manner-of-speaking verbs and described the results of a study conducted to gauge the extent to which each verb connotes inherent gender, if such inherent gender exists. The results of the study showed that the inherent stereotypical gender of a subject greatly influences respondents' choice of which verb best completes a sentence. Participants' responses also indicated that certain manner-of-speaking verbs are exclusively female, and that stereotypically male verbs of this type may not exist in English.

  • January 8
    "LEGO: The building blocks of teaching linguistic interoperability" with Brent Miller (Eastern Michigan University), Justin Petro (Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Portland, Oregon.
    Digital interoperability is essential to the exchange of information in linguistics, and technologically-oriented projects are an effective method by which graduate students can learn this component of research directly. LEGO (Lexicon Enhancement via the GOLD Ontology, NSF BCS-0753321), a project run by the LINGUIST List, has digitized several lexicons and tagged them with concepts from GOLD (General Ontology for Linguistic Description). Because the data is linked to GOLD, users will be able to search for grammatical information across lexica. The project's graduate students have learned how to transform XML-formatted lexica using XSLT, manipulate databases to organize data, and implement decisions about data display. This poster will illustrate how these skills have better prepared the student team members for careers in linguistics by teaching them how to analyze and manipulate lexical data, and by emphasizing the importance of interoperability in creating a digital infrastructure for linguistic research.

  • January 5-8
    "LL-MAP: Three Interns’ Journey with Language and Technology" with Brent Woo (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List), Georgina Brown (The LINGUIST List), Christine Evans (The LINGUIST List), Danielle St. Jean (The LINGUIST List) . Location: Portland, Oregon.
    Brent, Christine, and George were scheduled to present a poster for the panel titled “Tech Tools: Increasing Technology Training in the Curriculum of Graduate Students in Linguistics”. As the name suggests, the panel highlighted the increasing importance of technological competence for students wishing to advance in the field. The poster presented was titled: “LL-MAP: Three interns’ journey with language and technology”. The poster was co-authored by the three interns assembled by Amy Brunett, the LL-MAP team leader. Summer interns dealt primarily with LL-MAP, the language mapping project, the procedure of which requires multiple software packages and working knowledge of several markup languages, such as XML and HTML. The poster described, in brief, the process of digitizing and rectifying a paper map in order to make it compatible with the public interface, and detailed the skills and technology involved.


  • 2011

  • October 10
    "The LEGO Project" with Brent Miller (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List) . Location: Frankfurt, Germany.
    Participants in the RELISH Project met with collaborators in the Europe-based LOEWE Project to discuss issues of interoperability and digital archiving of linguistic information, based on results from their respective projects.

  • October 10
    "LEGO and RELISH 2: Harmonizing Lexicon Structure" with Helen Aristar-Dry (Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Frankfurt, Germany.
    Participants in the RELISH Project met with collaborators in the Europe-based LOEWE Project to discuss issues of interoperability and digital archiving of linguistic information, based on results from their respective projects.

  • October 10
    "LEGO and RELISH 1: Harmonizing Lexicon Terminology" with Justin Petro (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List) . Location: Frankfurt, Germany.
    Participants in the RELISH Project met with collaborators in the Europe-based LOEWE Project to discuss issues of interoperability and digital archiving of linguistic information, based on results from their respective projects.

  • March 25
    "Language Revitalization from Afar: An Endangered Language Community in Kenya" with Fatemeh Abdollahi (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List) . Location: Student Center, Eastern Michigan University.
    The world’s linguistic diversity is in severe jeopardy. Of the approximately 6,500 languages spoken in the world today, 96% are spoken by only 4% of the world’s population. This presentation describes recent efforts undertaken in Ekegusii, an endangered language of Kenya, to educate and train linguists and community members in language documentation, description and revitalization. Specific attention will be given to the development of instructional materials for endangered language communities in a long-distance format.


  • 2010

  • October 1
    "Women can’t tell jokes: A gender ideology in interaction" with Christy Bird (Eastern Michigan University/The LINGUIST List) . Location: Wellington, New Zealand.
    In J. Holmes & M. Marra (Eds.), Femininity, feminism and gendered discourse: a selected and edited collection of papers from the fifth International Language and Gender Association Conference (pp. 83-110). Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars.


  • 2009

  • June 24
    "The LINGUIST List: From a mailing list to a research institute" with Evelyn Richter (The LINGUIST List) . Location: Chemnitz University of Technology.
    The LINGUIST List has come a long way since its foundation by Anthony Aristar in 1990 with 60 subscribers. Today, ca. 20 LINGUIST student editors post book and conference announcements, calls for papers, discussions, dissertation abstracts, FYIs, internships, jobs, etc. to 26,000 subscribers. However, few people know about the variety of research projects LINGUIST is involved in. The Electronic Metastructure for Endangered Languages Data (E-MELD) project is already completed. At present further major research projects are in development, namely MultiTree: A digital library of language relationships, Language and Location: A Map Annotation Project (LL-MAP), General Ontology of Language Description (GOLD) Community and Lexicon Enhancement via the GOLD Ontology (LEGO) at the Institute for Language Information and Technology (ILIT), the home of The LINGUIST List.

  • March 23
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    "LL-MAP: Synthesizing SE Asia Language Maps" with Matthew Lahrman (Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Ypsilanti, MI.
    At the 2009 Graduate Research Fair, Matthew Lahrman presented on synthesizing and creating maps for Southeast Asian languages as part of his work on the LL-MAP Project, a project designed to integrate language information with data from the physical and social sciences by means of a Geographical Information System (GIS).

  • March 14
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    "Preserving Geolinguistic Documentation: From Paper Maps to GIS at the ANLC" with Hunter Lockwood (LINGUST List), Stephane Morse (LINGUST List), Andrea Berez (University of California, Santa Barbara), Gary Holton (University of Alaska, Fairbanks) . Location: University of Hawaii, Manoa.
    Hunter, Stephanie, Andrea and Gary presented on the difficulties of maintaining and digitizing geolinguistic data. This presentation was based on work conducted at the Alaska Native Language Archive (at University of Alaska, Fairbanks) in August of 2008 as part of the LL-Map project. Findings were presented at the 1st International Conference on Language Documentation and Conservation at the beautiful University of Hawaii. If you would like to hear the presentation, please visit the conference website.

  • January 8-11
    "MultiTree - a digital library of language relationships" with Bethany Townsend (Eastern Michigan University), Susan Smith (Wayne State University) . Location: San Francisco, CA.
    At the LSA 2009 Conference, Bethany Townsend and Susan Smith gave a poster presentation for MultiTree, an online, NSF-funded research project that will include all scholarly hypotheses about these relationships, represented as trees. The poster highlighted the main aspects of MultiTree, including an interface with a hyperbolic viewer, and node codes that give a lect a constant identity, allowing for the comparison of different hypotheses.

  • January 8-11
    "Vowel perception and the chronology of the Northern Cities Shift" with Luiza Newlin-Lukowicz (Eastern Michigan University) . Location: San Francisco, CA.
    At the LSA 2009 Conference, Luiza Newlin-Lukwoicz presented on her investigation of listener perception of /æ/, /oh/, and /o/manifesting different degrees of shifting. In this presentation, she evaluated two conflicting views on the chronology of the Northern Cities Shift, thus bringing into question apparent-time approaches to the reconstruction of chain shifts.

  • January 8-11
    "Vowel duration in AAVE" with Catherine Adams (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: San Francisco, CA.
    At the annual Linguistic Society of America (LSA) Conference, Catherine Adams gave a presentation on the results of the comparison of the duration of tense versus lax vowels in a corpus of African American Vernacular English (AAVE) speech from Southeastern Michigan.


  • 2008

  • November 6-9
    "LL-MAP - a tool for mapping sociolinguistic variation" with Luiza Newlin-Lukowicz (Eastern Michigan University/LINGUIST List), Daniel Parker (Eastern Michigan University/LINGUIST List) . Location: Houston, TX.
    At NWAV 37, Luiza Newlin-Lukowicz and Daniel Parker presented the NSF-funded project developed at the LINGUIST List, LL-MAP (Language and Location - a Map Annotation Project). Their talk focused on several features of this online facility and demonstrated its usefulness in sociolinguistic research.

  • May 15-17
    "Bamboo Workshop" Location: University of Chicago.
    Helen Aristar-Dry, Anthony Aristar, Michael Appleby and Bethany Townsend attended the workshop "The Planning Process & Understanding Arts and Humanities Scholarship" at the University of Chicago, Illinois. The workshop was part of The Bamboo Planning Project, which brings together faculty, IT representatives, and librarians to discuss digital support for the Humanities

  • February 8
    "Democracy and Reliability: A report on an international effort to update linguistics articles in Wikipedia" with Luiza Newlin-Lukowicz and Roxana Ma Newman (The LINGUIST List) . Location: Student Center, Eastern Michigan University.
    Luiza Newlin-Lukowicz and Roxana Ma Newman gave a presentation on LINGUIST's Wikipedia Update Project to revise and edit linguistics articles in the online encyclopedia. The presentation was given in the context of the one-day symposium "Democracy in Our Wiki-World," sponsored by EMU's Department of English Language and Literature and the Department of History and Philosophy.


  • 2007

  • November 2-3
    "Conference on Cultural and Linguistic Diversity" with Anthony Aristar (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: World Language Centre, Iceland.
    Anthony Aristar gave a presentation on ILIT's E-MELD Project in a special session featuring the research and projects of language institutes around the world. This was part of the Conference on Cultural and Linguistic Diversity held at the World Language Centre in Iceland.

  • October 15
    "Computational Approaches to Mapping and Visualizing Language Data" with Dan Parker (Eastern Michigan University), Benjamin Cool (Eastern Michigan University) . Location: New England Center, New Hampshire.

  • October 15-17
    "Internationalization and Unicode Conference" with Michael Appleby (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: San Jose, California.
    Michael Appleby was a panelist in the "Unicode on the Front Lines" session of the 31st Internationalization and Unicode Conference in San Jose, CA and spoke on the use of Unicode in ILIT's E-MELD Project for documenting endangered languages.

  • October 14-16
    "NSF/NEH Workshop on Documentation of Endangered Languages" with Anthony Aristar and Helen Aristar-Dry (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Durham, New Hampshire.
    Anthony Aristar and Helen Aristar-Dry were invited to and attended the NSF/NEH Workshop on Documentation of Endangered Languages, New England Center, Durham, NH.

  • October 9-10
    "Oliver Wilke Stiftung" with Michael Appleby (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: University of Buffalo.
    Michael Appleby represented ILIT at a meeting on human languages of the Oliver Wilke Stiftung held at the University of Buffalo.

  • October 1-3
    "NSF Human and Social Dynamics Workshop" with Anthony Aristar and Helen Aristar-Dry (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Washington, DC.
    Anthony Aristar and Helen Aristar-Dry were invited to and attended the NSF Human and Social Dynamics Workshop, Washington, DC.

  • September 26-28
    "NSF Workshop on Data Visualization" with Anthony Aristar and Helen Aristar-Dry (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Washington, DC.
    Anthony Aristar and Helen Aristar-Dry were invited to and attended the NSF Workshop on Data Visualization, Washington, DC.

  • September 13-16
    "Mapping new territory: Integrating GIS into a cyberinfrastructure for linguistics" with Helen Aristar-Dry (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland.
    Helen Aristar-Dry presented a plenary paper, "Mapping new territory: Integrating GIS into a cyberinfrastructure for linguistics" at the 38th Poznan Linguistic Meeting held at Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland.

  • July 13-15
    "TILR Workshop" with Michael Appleby (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Stanford University.
    Michael Appleby gave a demonstration of the GOLD ontology at the "Toward the Interoperability of Language Resources (TILR)" Workshop at Stanford, CA, to show how to access it from the ILIT website and encourage feedback from linguists.

  • June 25-29
    "MPI-EVA Database Meeting" with Anthony Aristar (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology.
    Anthony Aristar attended a language database meeting at the Department of Linguistics of the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany.

  • June 1-3
    "Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium (SILS)" Location: Mt. Pleasant, Michigan.
    Helen Aristar-Dry presented a paper, "Technology in Language Documentation," at the Stabilizing Indigenous Languages Symposium (SILS) in Mt. Pleasant, MI. Bethany Townsend and Megan Zdrojkowski were co-organizers of the symposium. Other crew members who attended were Catherine Adams, Ania Kubisz, Matt Lahrman, Dan Parker, Jeremy Taylor, Jana Thompson, Hunter Townsend, and Martin Warin.

  • May 8-18
    "Surrey Morphology Group" with Helen Aristar-Dry, Michael Appleby & Martin Warin (ILIT, Eastern Michigan University) . Location: University of Surrey.
    Helen Aristar-Dry, Michael Appleby, and Martin Warin traveled to the University of Surrey to work with members of the Surrey Morphology Group who are collaborating on ILIT's GOLD Ontology project.

  • January 4-7
    "Linguistic Society of America (LSA) Annual Meeting" Location: Anaheim, California.
    Anthony Aristar, Helen Aristar-Dry, and LINGUIST List crew members attended the Linguistic Society of America (LSA) Annual Meeting in Anaheim, CA.



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