LINGUIST List 10.1108

Mon Jul 19 1999

Jobs: Linguist Engineer, Lecturer in Linguistics

Editor for this issue: Jody Huellmantel <jodylinguistlist.org>


Directory

  1. Dan Faulkner, Linguist Engineer
  2. Larry Trask, Lecturer in Linguistics (Sussex)

Message 1: Linguist Engineer

Date: Mon, 19 Jul 1999 10:19:05 +0100
From: Dan Faulkner <Dan.Faulkneraculab.com>
Subject: Linguist Engineer


Aculab PLC has a vacancy for a linguist to work on its text-to-speech
synthesis project. The position involves the development of linguistic
processing modules for text-to-speech synthesis. Applicants should
have a masters degree or higher in a linguistics related field,
although those with a good first degree and relevant commercial
experience will be considered. Candidates' area of expertise should
be based in phonetics/phonology/prosody.

Applicants must be natively fluent in a romance language (preferably
French, Italian or Spanish), and will ideally have a good knowledge of
the linguistic structure of the other major romance languages. They
should be able to make practical decisions based on existing
knowledge, as a short time to market is envisaged for the product. Any
knowledge of procedural programming languages (such as C, C++) would
be advantageous, but is not essential.

Applicants should contact Eve Jesson with a CV and a covering letter;

e-mail.
Eve.Jessonaculab.com

fax.
+44 1908 273 801

post.

Aculab PLC,
Lakeside,
Bramley Road,
Mount Farm,
Milton Keynes,
MK1 1PT
UK

	
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: Lecturer in Linguistics (Sussex)

Date: Mon, 19 Jul 1999 15:57:03 +0100 (BST)
From: Larry Trask <larrytcogs.susx.ac.uk>
Subject: Lecturer in Linguistics (Sussex)



(Reference 132) 
 
 The University of Sussex at Brighton
 
 Lectureship in Linguistics (Grade A/B)
 
 
The Linguistics Subject Group in the School of Cognitive and Computing
Sciences is seeking to strengthen its areas of research expertise by
appointing an additional Lecturer in Linguistics. This is a full-time
permanent post, which may be filled either on the A scale or on the B
scale, depending upon the qualifications of the successful applicant.
The expected start date is 1 October 1999 or as soon as possible
thereafter.
 
Applications will be considered from candidates with specialisms in
any areas of linguistics, though preference is likely be given to
candidates able to offer specialisms in one or more of the following
areas: psycholinguistics, language change, semantics, cognitive
linguistics. The successful applicant will be expected to teach
undergraduate and postgraduate courses in several areas of
linguistics, to supervise research students, to undertake a share of
administrative duties and to make an important contribution to the
Subject Group's research profile.
 
The Linguistics Subject Group is contained within the School of
Cognitive and Computing Sciences. This School environment provides
extensive technical support for research, and the Group shares
high-quality laboratory provision with the other subjects represented
in the School.

Salary in the range: 16,655-21,815 pounds per annum (Grade A) or
22,726-29,048 pounds per annum (Grade B). Salaries under review.
Closing date: Friday, 13 August 1999.

Informal enquiries may be made to Professor R. L. Trask, Subject Chair
of Linguistics, COGS, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9QH,
UK. Tel: (01273)-678693. Email: larrytcogs.susx.ac.uk
 
Application forms and further particulars are available from and should
be returned to Liz Showler, Staffing Services Office, Sussex House,
University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RH, UK. Tel: (01273)-877324.
Email: E.S.Showlersussex.ac.uk Please cite reference 132.

Details of the School are available at http://www.cogs.susx.ac.uk
Details of all posts can also be found via the website below.

	http://www.susx.ac.uk/Units/staffing

Sussex is an Equal-Opportunity Employer.


Larry Trask
COGS
University of Sussex
Brighton BN1 9QH
UK

larrytcogs.susx.ac.uk
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue