LINGUIST List 10.1118

Fri Jul 23 1999

Qs: "Hooka hey", Glides, Feature Acquisition/L2

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Directory

  1. Yangna, Lakota?-"Hooka hey!" meaning
  2. Francisco Dubert, glides
  3. Arash Behazin, Order of acquisition in L2 learners of English

Message 1: Lakota?-"Hooka hey!" meaning

Date: Tue, 20 Jul 1999 17:09:28 EDT
From: Yangna <Yangnaaol.com>
Subject: Lakota?-"Hooka hey!" meaning


I am looking for the exact meaning of "Hooka hey!". Is it Lakota or Sioux 
based?
Any help much appreciated.
Peter Boyd
yangnaaol.com
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Message 2: glides

Date: Thu, 22 Jul 1999 12:51:21 +0200
From: Francisco Dubert <fgdubertusc.es>
Subject: glides



Dear colleagues

Could somebody tell me how H. Sweet defines "glide" in the book _A Primer
of Phonetics_, Oxford, 1906?

I need the definition that Sweet gives in this book and I can't consult it.

Thanks in advance.
Francisco Dubert Garcma
Departamento de Filoloxma Galega
Universidade de Santiago de Compostela
Santiago de Compostela
Espaqa
e-mail: fgdubertusc.es
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Message 3: Order of acquisition in L2 learners of English

Date: Thu, 22 Jul 1999 23:41:56 +0330
From: Arash Behazin <arash.behazinmailcity.com>
Subject: Order of acquisition in L2 learners of English

Dear linguists I'd be really grateful if you 'll be kind enough to
provide me with your helpful ideas and suggestions for my MA
thesis. In fact I'm studying an order of acquisition in terms of
formal features, this is a minimalist approach to the study of (L1
persian) English Interlanguage.
 Research questions can be narrowed down as followings:
 1- Do formal features pose acquisition problems, if any, for L2 learners of English?
 2- Which type of formal features poses more acquisition problems for L2 learners 
 of English?
 3- Do the type of formal features and the level of language proficiency have 
 any interaction in language acquisition?
 4- Are different types of formal features acquired simultaneously?

By the type of features I mean interpretability and
uninterpretability of formal features. An interesting correlate of the
distinction between interpretable and uninterpretable features (which
Radford 1997 reports) is in the case of creole languages. It seems
that Jamaican Creole has a simplified morphology and this simplicity
can be due to the absence of uninterpretable features such as case
feature ("mi" in Jamaican = "I", "me" and "my" in English). Other
reports are likely to indicate that uninterpretable features pose
particular acquisition problems for young children acquiring
English. The evidences which support this claim are those such as
learning of the interpretable singular/plural number features in nouns
like dog/dogs before the uninterpretable case feature of pronouns like
I/me, and the interpretable past-tense feature in verbs like went
before the uninterpretable third person singular agreement-feature in
forms like goes.
 The major hypothesis here could be as follows:
 Interpretable features are acquired earlier than uninterpretable features. (In FLA)
 There are a number of minor hypothesis too which can be stated as below:
 a) Uninterpretable features pose acquisition problems for L2 learners of English 
 ar all levels of L2 proficiency.
 b) Interpretable features pose acquisition problems for L2 learners of lower 
 levels of proficiency.
 I'm looking forward to here from you, all suggestions would be welcomed! 
 If you think more information is needed about research procedure and method, 
 sampling, data analysis, etc please let me know.


 Very truly yours Arash Behazin

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