LINGUIST List 10.116

Tue Jan 26 1999

Qs: German, Morphology, Online-communication

Editor for this issue: Jody Huellmantel <jodylinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Jennifer Dailey-O'Cain, Course materials: German dialects and German phonetics
  2. Wright Frank, Morphological Irregularity
  3. Ott Sascha global99, Effects of online-communication on language use

Message 1: Course materials: German dialects and German phonetics

Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 14:41:01 -0700 (MST)
From: Jennifer Dailey-O'Cain <jenniedoualberta.ca>
Subject: Course materials: German dialects and German phonetics

Fellow linguists,

I'm a professor of German linguistics at the University of Alberta in
Canada, and I'm interested in learning about any materials you folks
have found helpful in teaching courses about German dialects or German
phonetics (especially comparative German-English phonetics). Book
recommendations are certainly welcome, but I am especially interested
in materials that would include cassette tapes or other media (i.e.,
software?).

Please email me, as I normally only read Confs, Calls, and Jobs. Thank you
very much!

- -
Jennifer Dailey-O'Cain <*>
University of Alberta, MLCS
Email: jenniedoualberta.ca
Personal Home Page: http://www.ualberta.ca/~jenniedo/
Applied Linguistics Home Page: http://www.ualberta.ca/~modlang/applied/
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Message 2: Morphological Irregularity

Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 17:19:26 -0500
From: Wright Frank <wjfrankacsu.buffalo.edu>
Subject: Morphological Irregularity


Dear Linguist listfolk,

I'm studying a language (Nuer, Nilo-Saharan) with what seems like
rampantly irregular morphology. What is a "normal" percentage of
morphologically complex words that are irregular? I know that
languages and individual morphological processes vary widely (English
singular/plural morphology is very regular, English verb morphology
less so, German verbs less still), but what are the upper and lower
ranges for this kind of thing, percentage-wise? I've scanned the
literature with little luck.

Any help is appreciated.

Wright Frank
SUNY at Buffalo
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Message 3: Effects of online-communication on language use

Date: Tue, 26 Jan 1999 14:54:13 +0100 (MET)
From: Ott Sascha global99 <o-ottsasjmk.su.se>
Subject: Effects of online-communication on language use


Hej, from the far north!

I'm doing research at the University of Stockholm about the effects
of the frequent use of online-communication on the way we make use of
(English) language.

How does the language in our e-mails, chatting etc differ from the
so-called normal language (neologisms, abbreviations, signs for
gestures etc)?

And moreover: How does the frequent use of that kind of tech-speak
affect the usage of language in everyday life?

I need every kind of information about research-projects and results,
contact persons, websites, newsgroups, mailing lists and so on.

Thank you for all suggestions!

Sascha Ott
University of Stockholm, Sweden
o-ottsasjmk.su.se
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