LINGUIST List 10.133

Fri Jan 29 1999

Qs: In-law discourse, Etymology

Editor for this issue: Brett Churchill <brettlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Gina Guida, Q: Mother-in-law/Daughter-in-law Discourse
  2. Douglas North, Ph.D., Etymology

Message 1: Q: Mother-in-law/Daughter-in-law Discourse

Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 13:33:29 -0500
From: Gina Guida <GGuidatklp.com>
Subject: Q: Mother-in-law/Daughter-in-law Discourse

Hello Linguists,

I am in the beginning stages of researching mother-in-law / daughter-in-law
discourse as a possible thesis topic. Does anyone know if any research on
this has been done before, and if so, where would I find it? 

Please send me information at: desantisgalpha.montclair.edu

I appreciate your help.
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Message 2: Etymology

Date: Thu, 28 Jan 1999 10:27:38 -0900
From: Douglas North, Ph.D. <dnorthalaskapacific.edu>
Subject: Etymology


I would like to ask the members of the Linguist Network if anyone
knows what "hackerd" means? It is mentioned in "Cold Mountain," a
novel of backcountry North Carolina during the Civil War--
 "... ragged as a hackerd" is the exact quotation. Thanks for any help.
Doug North, President, Alaska Pacific University.
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