LINGUIST List 10.356

Sat Mar 6 1999

Disc: 'Cutting the Mustard'

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


Directory

  1. John Lynch, Re: 10.342, Disc: "Cutting the mustard"
  2. jcass, Re: 10.342, Disc: "Cutting the mustard"

Message 1: Re: 10.342, Disc: "Cutting the mustard"

Date: Sat, 6 Mar 1999 07:31:38 +0000
From: John Lynch <jlynchldta.demon.co.uk>
Subject: Re: 10.342, Disc: "Cutting the mustard"


>The phrase *cut the muster* has never existed. The modern expression
>*can't cut the mustard* derives from *to be the mustard* in which
>*mustard* meant 'genuine article' or 'main attraction'. Further
>details can be found in Robert Hendrickson's THE FACTS ON FILE
>ENCYCLOPEDIA OR WORD AND PHRASE ORIGINS.
>
>Marc Picard
>
To say that someone is 'mustard' at something is still a term of
approbation in parts of Britain
- 
John Lynch
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: Re: 10.342, Disc: "Cutting the mustard"

Date: Sat, 06 Mar 1999 10:14:30 -0500
From: jcass <jcassbellsouth.net>
Subject: Re: 10.342, Disc: "Cutting the mustard"

Just an FYI on known present usage of "Muster". I work for a large
manufacturing plant that takes employee safety very seriously.
Whenever we have to evacuate the plant (so far, only for
fire/evacuation DRILLS), we gather outside in designated "Muster
Areas". This seems like an archaic term, but it does make sense to
"gather" in "muster" areas. I must say, however, that because it is
such a strange word for most people, they often refer to gathering in
"Mustard Areas". I suppose that's close to the "Ketchup Zone".

- J. Cass



Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue