LINGUIST List 10.921

Tue Jun 15 1999

Confs: Teaching Linguistics: Workshop at LSA Institute

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  1. lml1, The Linguistics Classroom: What Works, What Doesn't

Message 1: The Linguistics Classroom: What Works, What Doesn't

Date: Tue, 15 Jun 1999 17:10:13 -0400 (EDT)
From: lml1 <lml1cornell.edu>
Subject: The Linguistics Classroom: What Works, What Doesn't

The following workshop will be held during the 1999 LSA Linguistic 
Institute at the University of Illinois. It is open to everyone, novice 
or experienced, interested in teaching undergraduate linguistics. The 
Saturday sessions include teaching demonstrations and the Sunday sessions 
provide an opportunity for participants to share teaching ideas and 
materials in smaller groups.

Organizers: Lisa Lavoie and Sally McConnell-Ginet, Cornell University

TEACHING LINGUISTICS: WHAT WORKS, WHAT DOESN'T
Workshop sponsored by the Linguistic Society of America

FRIDAY, JULY 16, Levis Conference Center 407

7:00-7:30
Registration (Institute-mandated fee of $7)

7:30
Introductory linguistics: Teaching students what they would like to know
Mark Aronoff, State University of New York at Stony Brook
 
Social Hour, Third Floor, Levis Conference Center immediately following
first session
 

SATURDAY, JULY 17, Levis Conference Center 407
 
9-9:15
Late registration

9:15-10:15
Syntax (see below for homework assignment)
Jorge Hankamer, University of California at Santa Cruz
 
10:15-11:15 Semantics
Bill Ladusaw, University of California at Santa Cruz
 
11:15-11:45
Refreshment break
 
11:45-12:45
Phonology
Jennifer Cole, University of Illinois
 
12:45-2:15
Lunch (participants are on their own for lunch)
 
2:15-3:15
Sociolinguistics
Walt Wolfram, North Carolina State University
 
3:15-4:15
Language and Gender
Penelope Eckert, Stanford University
 
4:15-4:45
Refreshment break
 
4:45-5:45
Computational Linguistics
Dan Jurafsky, University of Colorado
 

SUNDAY, JULY 18, Armory (note change in location)
 
9:30-11
Small group sessions and demos* in Armory 133, 134, 136, 137, 241, 242
 
11-11:30
Refreshment break (outside Armory 101)
 
11:30-12:30
Wrap-up, Armory 101
 
*Participants with teaching materials they want to share in small group
sessions should contact lml1cornell.edu or smg9cornell.edu.
 

JORGE HANKAMER HAS ASSIGNED THE FOLLOWING PROBLEM FOR THE SYNTAX SESSION;
THE TEACHING METHOD BEING DEMONSTRATED ASSUMES PEOPLE HAVE DONE WORK ON
ASSIGNED PROBLEM.
 
A Syntax Puzzle*
 
*This interesting pattern was discovered by Chris Barker
 
A. Consider the following facts:

 (1) It is stupid to dance like that.
 (2) It is fun to be stupid.
 (3) *It is fun to be stupid to dance like that.
 
Explain, in terms of whatever theory of syntax you have developed, the
grammaticality of exx (1)-(2) and the ungrammaticality of ex (3).
 
B. After doing that, propose and defend derivations for (4) and (5), and
explain the ungrammaticality of (6):
 
 (4) It is stupid for Bob to dance like that.
 (5) It is fun for Bob to be stupid.
 (6) *It is fun for Bob to be stupid to dance like that.
 
C. Now explain the following ungrammaticality:
 
 (7) *It is fun for it to be stupid to dance like that.
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