LINGUIST List 11.1291

Thu Jun 8 2000

Calls: Syntax in Schools, Ling/Phonetics/LP 2000

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text.

Directory

  1. Rebecca Wheeler, Syntax in the Schools
  2. palek, Conf.LP2000

Message 1: Syntax in the Schools

Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2000 13:59:23 -0400 (EDT)
From: Rebecca Wheeler <rwheelercnu.edu>
Subject: Syntax in the Schools


Call for Papers: Syntax in the Schools


HOW TEXTBOOK PUBLISHING, STATE EDUCATION BOARDS AND TEST-MAKING
ORGANIZATIONS AFFECT THE TEACHING OF GRAMMAR IN THE SCHOOLS

"Syntax in the Schools" invites submissions on the topic of the textbook
publishing industry, the state education boards, and/or test-making
organizations as these affect the teaching of grammar in the schools (K -
16). 

These three spheres of business and government play central roles in
establishing the grammar curriculum. Educators in grammar and the
language arts may know little about their operations, despite the fact
that this triumvirate signally influences how we teach what grammar in the
schools. Those concerned with grammar and its place in education would
benefit by better understanding the infrastructure beneath the grammar
textbooks and grammar standards that play a role in every school. 

We seek thoughtful examination of historic patterns and current
considerations on the issue of how textbook publishing, state education
boards and test-taking organizations influence the teaching of grammar in
the schools.

Submissions should conform to MLA style and should not exceed 2,500 words.
Graphics (including charts, tables, figures, etc.) should be submitted
as separate TIFF files. 

Please submit ms. in both soft and hard copy to Rebecca S. Wheeler, Dept.
of English, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA 23606-2998;
fax (757) 594-8870; phone (757) 599-8891; rwheelercnu.edu. Articles will
be reviewed by 2 anonymous referees. Manuscripts received by September 1
will be considered for the autumn 2000 newsletter; ms. received
subsequently will be considered for later issues.

To subscribe to "Syntax in the Schools" please see 
http://www2.pct.edu/courses/evavra/ATEG/SiS.htm


*********************************************
Rebecca S. Wheeler, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of English
Christopher Newport University
1 University Place
Newport News, VA 23606-2998

Editor, Syntax in the Schools
The newsletter of the Assembly for the Teaching of English Grammar
(ATEG), an assembly of the NCTE

phone: (757) 594-8891; fax: (757) 594-8870
email: rwheelercnu.edu

*********************************************
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Message 2: Conf.LP2000

Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2000 20:46:27 +0200 (MET DST)
From: palek <palekcuni.cz>
Subject: Conf.LP2000


 Conference LP 2000: 
Item order - its variety and linguistic and phonetic consequences
 
 Charles University, Prague
 August 21st -25th, 2000
 http: // www.cuni.cz/lp

 LP 2000 [Linguistics and Phonetics] is organized by the Department of 
Linguistics and Phonetics of Charles University in Prague in cooperation with 
The Ohio State University and Prague-based Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty. It
is the fifth in a series of LP conferences established after the democratic 
changes in 1989.
The theme of the last three conferences (LPs 1994 (Prague), 1996 (Prague) and 
1998 (Columbus, OH)) was item order in various contexts: typology, universals,
speech production, processes of prosodic patterns in discourse and others.(the
proceedings of the conferences: http://www.cuni.cz/lp
The term item order covers any linguistic unit such as phoneme, morpheme, 
syllable, word, phrase, clause, sentence, utterance, etc. The aim of LP 2000 is
to contribute to the explanation of the syntactic and semantic role of item 
order in the theory of universal grammar and in parametric variation of 
languages (linguistic typology). The theme covers, among others, the following
topics:											
 the role of item order in various grammatical systems (such as 
 consequences for movements, optional and free movements - i.e. scrambling 
 and free word order, symmetry and asymmetry in syntax), 

 the role of item order in the structure of phonetic organization of 
 utterances (phonemoidicity vs phonology, prosody),

 the role of item order for semantic and pragmatic understanding of 
 sentences and discourse,

 the various forms of representation of item order (including orthographic
 transcription systems, written language etc), sign orderings.

The preliminary program includes the following papers to be presented by 
invited speakers:

 William R. Leben, Osamu Fujimura (Ohio State University): New view of the 
 the role of syllable

 Susan Fischer (University of Rochester): Toward a Typology of Signed 
 languages

 Knut Tarald Taraldsen (Tromso University): Complement V vs V complement 
 order in Germanic

 Yang Huang (University of Reading) Anaphora and item order

The Preliminary program will be announced and updated at www.cuni.cz/lp; 
submitted papers are related to prosodic organization of speech in discourse 
and to word order in typologically different languages (such as Armenian, 
Chinese, Taiwanese, Tatar, Korean, Russian, Czech, Hebrew, Finnish, Japanese, 
Riau Indonesian).

The final term for the submitting of papers and abstracts is

 July 15, 2000

Keynote speeches are scheduled for 45 minutes + 15 minutes discussion
Session papers 30 minutes

The application form is at www.cuni.cz/lp.

- ----------------------------------------------------
Papers will be published in the Proceedings LP2000. Information for 
contributors to the proceedings is at www.cuni.cz/lp.
The deadline for submitting papers to Proceedings is September 30, 2000.
- ----------------------------------------------------

Please, send your Preliminary application form and abstract to both 
organizers 
 palekruk.cuni.cz or
 fujimura.1osu.edu 
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