LINGUIST List 11.1353

Mon Jun 19 2000

Calls: PSYCOLOQUY - Call for Multiple Book Reviewers

Editor for this issue: Jody Huellmantel <jodylinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text.

Directory

  1. Stevan Harnad, "TOWARDS ELECTRONIC JOURNALS": PSYC Call for Book Reviewers
  2. Stevan Harnad, Language-Origins: PSYC Call for Multiple Book Reviewers

Message 1: "TOWARDS ELECTRONIC JOURNALS": PSYC Call for Book Reviewers

Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 21:53:39 +0100 (BST)
From: Stevan Harnad <harnadcoglit.ecs.soton.ac.uk>
Subject: "TOWARDS ELECTRONIC JOURNALS": PSYC Call for Book Reviewers

 PSYCOLOQUY CALL FOR BOOK REVIEWERS:

 Tenopir/King: Towards Electronic Journals

 Below is the Abstract of "Towards Electronic Journals" by Carol
 Tenopir and Donald W. King. This book has been selected for
 multiple review in Psycoloquy, a refereed journal of Open Peer
 Commentary in the biobehavioral and cognitive sciences. If you wish
 to submit a formal book review please write to
 psycpucc.princeton.edu 
 indicating what expertise you would bring to bear on reviewing the
 book if you were selected to review it.

 (If you have never reviewed for PSYCOLOQUY or Behavioral & Brain
 Sciences before, it would be helpful if you could also append a
 copy of your CV to your inquiry.) If you are selected as one of the
 reviewers and do not have a copy of the book, you will be sent a
 copy of the book directly by the publisher (please let us know if
 you have a copy already). Reviews may also be submitted without
 invitation, but all reviews will be refereed. The author will reply
 to all accepted reviews.

 FULL PSYCOLOQUY BOOK REVIEW INSTRUCTIONS AT:

 http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/psyc.html
 http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psycoloquy/

 FULL ARTICLE-LENGTH PRECIS OF THE BOOK IS RETRIEVABLE FROM:

 http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psyc-bin/newpsy?11.084

 Note: Psycoloquy reviews are of the BOOK not the Precis. Review
 Length should be about 200 lines [c. 1800 words], with a short
 abstract (about 50 words), an indexable title, and reviewer's full
 name and institutional address, email and Home Page URL. All
 references that are electronically accessible should also have
 URLs.

 AUTHORS' RATIONALE FOR SOLICITING MULTIPLE REVIEW: We would like
 scientists as authors, readers, editors, referees and observers of
 the coming electronic age to review the book through their personal
 experiences and knowledge, which they think confirm, reinforce, or
 refute our observations. We would also appreciate comments on our
 interpretation of results. We look at the book as a stepping-stone
 in our further study of electronic journals. Input from scientists
 is particularly desired for our future study.

psycoloquy.00.11.084.electronic-journals.1.tenopir Sun Jun 18 2000
ISSN 1055-0143 (53 paragraphs, 7 references, 954 lines)
PSYCOLOQUY is sponsored by the American Psychological Association (APA)
 Copyright 2000 Carol Tenopir & Donald W. King

 TOWARDS ELECTRONIC JOURNALS:
 REALITIES FOR SCIENTISTS, LIBRARIANS, AND PUBLISHERS
 [Special Libraries Association 2000, xxii + 488pp ISBN 0-87111-507-7]
 Precis of Tenopir on Electronic-Journals

 Carol Tenopir
 School of Information Sciences
 University of Tennessee
 804 Volunteer Boulevard
 Knoxville, TN 37919
 tenopirutk.edu
 http://web.utk.edu/~tenopir/tenopir.html

 Donald W. King
 4915 Gullane Drive
 Ann Arbor, MI 48103
 dwkingumich.edu

 ABSTRACT: This precis of "Towards Electronic Journals" (Tenopir &
 King 2000) focuses mostly on scientists' perspective as authors and
 readers, how changes over the years by publishers and librarians
 have affected scientists, and what they should expect from
 electronic journal and digital journal article databases. We
 describe some myths concerning scholarly journals and attempt to
 assess the future in a realistic manner. Most of our primary data
 involves U.S. scientists, libraries and publishers, but much of the
 secondary data is from a European perspective, which shows few
 differences.

 KEYWORDS: copyright, citation impact, digital library, electronic
 archives, electronic publishing, electronic journals, peer review,
 publication costs, research funding

 OVERVIEW OF CONTENTS: "Towards Electronic Journals" (Tenopir & King
 2000) is addressed to four audiences: scientists as authors and
 readers; journal publishers; librarians and other intermediaries;
 and organizational funders of scientists and libraries. An attempt
 was made: (1) to describe the communication practices of
 scientists, librarians, and publishers; (2) to establish their
 goals, motives, and incentives for the way in which they do things;
 and (3) to determine the cost and other economic aspects of their
 involvement. In particular, we felt it important for each journal
 system participant to gain a better understanding and appreciation
 of the contributions made by all participants and to enable them to
 make more informed decisions about electronic journals in the
 future.
 To achieve these objectives we partitioned the book into five
 parts, in addition to an introduction. A background part provides a
 summary of the quantitative results, a brief history of scientific
 scholarly journals including early electronic publishing, a
 framework for describing scholarly journals as a system embedded in
 larger communication and science systems, and a description of our
 data collection methods. Data include results from 13,591
 readership survey responses from scientists (1977 to 1998); more
 than 100 cost studies of library services, publishing, and
 scientists' authorship and information seeking; a study of the
 characteristics of a sample of 715 scholarly journals tracked from
 1960 to 1995; and review of more than 800 relevant publications.
 The next three parts address the principal participants: (1)
 scientists, including their general communication activities and
 journal authorship, readership and information-seeking patterns; (2)
 libraries, including general library use and journal-related
 services use and economics; and (3) publishers, including journal
 publishing costs, pricing, and financial considerations. The last
 part covers electronic publishing details and aspects appropriate
 to each of the journal system participants.

Tenopir, Carol, and Donald W. King (2000) Towards Electronic Journals:
Realities for Scientists, Librarians, and Publishers. Washington,
D.C.: Special Libraries Association.
http://www.sla.org

 FULL PRECIS IS RETRIEVABLE FROM:

 http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psyc-bin/newpsy?11.084

 FULL PSYCOLOQUY BOOK REVIEW INSTRUCTIONS AT:

 http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/psyc.html
 http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psycoloquy/
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Message 2: Language-Origins: PSYC Call for Multiple Book Reviewers

Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 15:59:04 +0100 (BST)
From: Stevan Harnad <harnadcoglit.ecs.soton.ac.uk>
Subject: Language-Origins: PSYC Call for Multiple Book Reviewers

 PSYCOLOQUY CALL FOR BOOK REVIEWERS of:

 "The Origins of Complex Language" 
 by Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy (OUP 1999)

 Below is the abstract of the Precis of "The Origins of Complex
 Language" by Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy (740 lines). This book has
 been selected for multiple review in Psycoloquy. If you wish to
 submit a formal book review please write to psycpucc.princeton.edu
 indicating what expertise you would bring to bear on reviewing the
 book if you were selected to review it.

 Full Precis: http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psyc-bin/newpsy?11.082

 (If you have never reviewed for PSYCOLOQUY or Behavioral & Brain
 Sciences before, it would be helpful if you could also append a
 copy of your CV to your inquiry.) If you are selected as one of the
 reviewers and do not have a copy of the book, you will be sent a
 copy of the book directly by the publisher (please let us know if
 you have a copy already). Reviews may also be submitted without
 invitation, but all reviews will be refereed. The author will reply
 to all accepted reviews.

 FULL PSYCOLOQUY BOOK REVIEW INSTRUCTIONS AT:

 http://www.princeton.edu/~harnad/psyc.html
 http://www.cogsci.soton.ac.uk/psycoloquy/

 Psycoloquy reviews are of the book, not the Precis. Length should
 be about 200 lines [c. 1800 words], with a short abstract (about 50
 words), an indexable title, and reviewer's full name and
 institutional address, email and Home Page URL. All references that
 are electronically accessible should also have URLs.

 AUTHOR'S RATIONALE FOR SOLICITING MULTIPLE BOOK REVIEW

 Most recent investigators assume that the brain has always been the
 most important part of human anatomy for the evolution of language,
 and do not seriously examine other conceivable directions in which
 grammatical evolution might have proceeded. In "The Origins of
 Complex Language," it is suggested that certain central features of
 language-as-it-is, notably the distinction between sentences and
 noun phrases, are by no means inevitable outcomes of linguistic or
 cognitive evolution, so that where they come from constitutes a
 genuine puzzle. The solution that is proposed is that
 grammar-as-it-is was, in fundamental respects, exapted from, or
 tinkered out of, the neural mechanisms that arose for the control
 of syllabically organized vocalization, made possible by (among
 other things) the descent of the larynx. This proposal turns upside
 down mainstream views about the relationship between language
 development and vocal tract development, and also challenges the
 logical and epistemological basis of notions closely tied to the
 distinction between sentences and noun phrases, such as
 'reference', 'predication' and 'assertion'. It should therefore be
 of interest to anthropologists, psychologists, cognitive
 scientists, linguists and philosophers of language.

psycoloquy.00.11.082.language-origins.1.carstairs-mccarthy Wed May 24 2000
ISSN 1055-0143 (44 paragraphs, 27 references, 85 lines)
PSYCOLOQUY is sponsored by the American Psychological Association (APA)
 Copyright 2000 Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy

 THE ORIGINS OF COMPLEX LANGUAGE
 [Oxford University Press 1999, ISBN 0-19-823822-3, 0-19-823821-5]
 Precis of Carstairs-McCarthy on Complex Language

 Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy
 University of Canterbury
 Department of Linguistics
 Private Bag 4800
 Christchurch
 New Zealand
 a.c-mccling.canterbury.ac.nz

 ABSTRACT: Some puzzling characteristics of grammar, such as the
 sentence/NP distinction and the organization of inflection classes,
 may provide clues about its prehistory. When bipedalism led to
 changes in the vocal tract that favoured syllabically organized
 vocalization, this made possible an increase in vocabulary which in
 turn rendered advantageous a reliable syntax, whose source was the
 neural mechanism for controlling syllable structure. Several
 features of syntax make sense as byproducts of characteristics of
 the syllable (for example, grammatical 'subjects' may be byproducts
 of onset margins). This scenario is consistent with evidence from
 biological anthropology, ape language studies, and brain
 neurophysiology.

 KEYWORDS: ape, aphasia, brain development, evolution of language,
 grammar, language, larynx, noun phrase, predication, principle of
 contrast, reference, sentence, sign language, speech, syllable,
 truth
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