LINGUIST List 11.2100

Mon Oct 2 2000

Books: Vanuatu Lang, Tongan Lang, African Ling

Editor for this issue: Naomi Ogasawara <naomilinguistlist.org>


Links to the websites of all LINGUIST's supporting publishers are available at the end of this issue.

Directory

  1. LINCOM EUROPA, Vanuatu Lang: The Lord's Prayer in Erromangan, T.Crowley
  2. LINCOM EUROPA, Tongan Lang: A Conceptual Analysis of Tongan Spatial Nouns, G.Bennardo
  3. LINCOM EUROPA, African Ling: Introduction to African Linguistics, N.Mutaka

Message 1: Vanuatu Lang: The Lord's Prayer in Erromangan, T.Crowley

Date: Sun, 01 Oct 2000 20:39:42 +0200
From: LINCOM EUROPA <LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de>
Subject: Vanuatu Lang: The Lord's Prayer in Erromangan, T.Crowley

The Lord's Prayer in Erromangan: 
Literacy and Translation in a Vanuatu Language

TERRY CROWLEY
University of Waikato

Erromangan, an Oceanic language of southern Vanuatu, has a written
literature that until recently was restricted exclusively to materials
relating to recently introduced Christianity. This literature is
entirely translated, with the materials written by European missionaries
in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In many respects,
these translations are structurally deviant to the point where
intelligibility is sometimes impaired.

Massive population loss and major language shift on the island in the
second half of the nineteenth century should has predisposed this
language to massive simplification and homogenisation in the direction
of English according to some scenarios, especially were literacy and
Christianisation are involved. However, the remaining Erromangan
language has remained vital, structurally complex and largely intact,
demonstrating that the linguistic disruption posed by
missionary-inspired literacy is nothing like as powerful as some have
suggested.


ISBN 3 89586 973 2. 
Languages of the World 13. 
Ca. 24 pp. USD 10 / DM 19 / � 6. 





Ordering information for individuals: Please give us your creditcard no.
/ expiry date. Prices in this information include shipment worldwide by
airmail. A standing order for this series is available with special
discounts offered to individual subscribers. 

Free copies of LINCOM'S newsflashes 22 & 23 are now available from
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.

LINCOM EUROPA, Freibadstr. 3, D-81543 Muenchen, Germany; 
FAX +49 89 62269404; 
http://www.lincom-europa.com
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.
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Message 2: Tongan Lang: A Conceptual Analysis of Tongan Spatial Nouns, G.Bennardo

Date: Sun, 01 Oct 2000 20:40:25 +0200
From: LINCOM EUROPA <LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de>
Subject: Tongan Lang: A Conceptual Analysis of Tongan Spatial Nouns, G.Bennardo

A Conceptual Analysis of Tongan Spatial Nouns:
>From Grammar to Mind

GIOVANNI BENNARDO
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

In Churchward (1953) a set of Tongan nouns are labeled 'local', that is
"construed as if it were the proper name of a place" (p. 88). Some of
these nouns reappear under another label, that is, 'preposed' nouns (p.
214-16) and they are defined as nouns that can be "placed immediately
before another noun instead of being connected with it by means of a
preposition" (p.214). This peculiarity was exploited by Broschart (1993)
to argue for a subset of these nouns to be considered as classifiers. In
this work the author tries to clarify the border of this fuzzy subset of
Tongan nouns differently addressed by Churchward and Broschard.

The analysis of this newly defined subset of Tongan nouns, 'spatial'
nouns, is conceptual, that is, based on a set of primitive (and possibly
universal) spatial concepts suggested by Lehman & Bennardo (1992) and
Bennardo (1993, 1996). The conceptual apparatus is the result of
extensive analyses conducted on both English and Tongan spatial
prepositions. Further analyses regarded representations of spatial
relationships in other languages like Burmese, Thai and Italian.
 
Following Lucy's suggestion, grammatical features of the Tongan language
represent the path along which the conceptual analysis moves. In fact, 
five structural contexts in which the 'spatial' nouns appear represent
the starting point of the analysis. The analysis will weave through the
grammatical and conceptual levels and will end up in sorting the nouns
into three separate groups according to a combination of their
conceptual content and grammatical possibilities. Finally, the results
of this analysis call for an interesting modification of the conceptual
apparatus.

3 89586 917 1. 
Languages of the World 12.
34pp. USD 10.50 / DM 22 / � 6.80. 




Ordering information for individuals: Please give us your creditcard no.
/ expiry date. Prices in this information include shipment worldwide by
airmail. A standing order for this series is available with special
discounts offered to individual subscribers. 

Free copies of LINCOM'S newsflashes 22 & 23 are now available from
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.

LINCOM EUROPA, Freibadstr. 3, D-81543 Muenchen, Germany; 
FAX +49 89 62269404; 
http://www.lincom-europa.com
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.
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Message 3: African Ling: Introduction to African Linguistics, N.Mutaka

Date: Sun, 01 Oct 2000 21:16:40 +0200
From: LINCOM EUROPA <LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de>
Subject: African Ling: Introduction to African Linguistics, N.Mutaka

Introduction to African Linguistics

NGESSIMO MUTAKA
Universit� de Yaound�

With the collaboration of PIUS NGWA TAMANJI

An Introduction to African Linguistics deals with the main features of 
languages as found mostly in Sub-Saharan Africa, and more particularly
in Bantu languages. 
As mentioned by one of the authors, "one motivation for writing the
book is that, during my graduate studies, I always wished I had access
to an introductory book of this nature. Very often, Doug Pulleyblank
or Larry Hyman would refer me to certain phonological processes found
in some African languages, and I thought it would be helpful if students
of African linguistics could have easier access to such examples in an
introductory book on African Linguistics. My hope is that this book will
prove interesting not only for most linguistics students but also for
any linguist or any linguistic sympathizer who will find in this book
precious information scattered in various published and unpublished
materials not easily accessible."
Maybe, what renders the book most unique is the three chapters on
Phonology: chapter 3: non tonal phonological processes, chapter 4:
tonological processes, chapter 5: exercises on phonological processes.
These chapters basically encapsulate the richness of African phonology
made available in one single introductory volume. Other chapters are
equally interesting. Thus chapter 8, "Notes on the historical
linguistics of African languages," provides background material on
African languages; chapter 7, "the Syntax of African languages,"
provides an easy-to-understand explanation of syntactic terms and their
illustrations through various African languages. This chapter is a
contribution of Pius N. Tamanji together with the sections on "lexical
expansion" in chapter 10, "verbal extensions,"and "tense, aspect and
mood" in chapter 6.

Chapter 1: Classification of African languages
1.0 Preliminaries: two types of classification - 
 typological or structural classification - genealogical classification 
1.1 Guthrie's classification 
1.2 Greenberg's classification 
1.2.1 Westermann's eastern and western sudanic languages 
1.2.2 Greenberg's classification 
1.2.3 Notes on Niger-Kordofanian 
1.2.4 Greenberg's methodology 
1.2.5 Why is Bantu part of Niger-Kongo? 
1.3 Earlier classifications 
1.4 Some recent proposals of classifications 
1.5 Classifications of Cameroonian languages in ALCAM 
1.6 About genetic classifications 

Chapter 2: Sound systems of African languages: phonetics 
2.1 Vowel characteristics of African languages 
2.1.0 Vowel chart 
2.1.1 Symmetrical vowel systems 
2.1.2 Allophonic variation 
2.1.3 Vowel length 
2.1.4 Phoneme nasalization 
2.1.5 Vowel harmony 
2.1.6 Vowel elision 
2.1.7 Vowel coalescence 
2.2 Consonant characteristics of African languages 
2.2.0 Consonant chart of African languages 
2.2.1 Doubly-articulated stops 
2.2.2 Aspirated consonants 
2.2.3 Palatal release 
2.2.4 Implosives 
2.25 Glottal stops 
2.2.6 Clicks 
2.2.7 Nasal + consonant sequences 
2.2.8 Geminates in Luganda 
2.3 Further characteristics of Bantu languages 
Exercises 

Chapter 3: Non tonal phonological processes 
3.1 Vowel harmony 
3.2 Nasalization 
3.3 Reduplication 
3.4 Compensatory lengthening 
3.5 Penultimate lengthening 
3.6 Syllabification 
3.7 Segment deletion/insertion 
3.8 Vowel coalescence 
3.9 Gliding 
3.10 Assimilation 
3.11 Dahl's law 
3.12 Vowel height transfer 
3.13 Voicing 
3.14 Aspiration 
3.15 Implosion 
3.16 Glottalization 
3.17 Palatalization 
3.18 Velarization/labialization 
3.19 Floating non tonal features 
3.20 Imbrication 
3.21 The mora as a prosodic unit 

Chapter 4: Tonological processes 
4.1 Tone groups 
4.2 Floating tones 
4.4 V2 linking 
4.5 Meeussen's rule 
4.6 Stevick's rule 
4.7 Downstep 
4.8 Upstep 
4.9 Latent High tone 
4.10 Tone retraction 
4.11 Effect of depressor consonants 
4.12 Some tonological processes in phrasal phonology 
4.13 Edge-in association 

Chapter 5 Exercises on phonological processes 

Chapter 6: Morphology 
6.1 The structure of the Bantu noun 
6.2 The structure of the verb 
6.3 Verbal extensions 
6.4 Tense, aspect and mood 

Chapter 7: The Syntax of African Languages 
7.1 Syntactic categories. 
7.2 Phrases, trees and rules. 
7.3 Transformations and derived structures. 
7.4 Agreement in sentence structure. 
7.5 Summary and Conclusion 

Chapter 8: Notes on historical linguistics 
8.1 Notes on the history of work on African languages 
8.2 Language reconstructions 
8.3 Sound changes from Proto-Bantu 

Chapter 9: Trade languages, pidgins, and creoles 
9.1 Definitions and exemplifications - Trade language - Pidgin -Creole 
9.2 Pidgin English of Cameroon (PEC) 

Chapter 10: Further issues in African linguistics 
10.1 Lexical expansion in African languages 
10.2 Glottochronology (or lexicostatistics) 
10.3 Dialectometry 
10.4 Linguistic geography 

3 89586 675 X. 
LINCOM Handbooks in Linguistics 16. 
Ca. 340pp. USD 74 / DM 128 / � 44.


 

Ordering information for individuals: Please give us your creditcard no.
/ expiry date. Prices in this information include shipment worldwide by
airmail. A standing order for this series is available with special
discounts offered to individual subscribers. 

Free copies of LINCOM'S newsflashes 22 (10/2000) & 23 (11/2000) are
available from LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.

LINCOM EUROPA, Freibadstr. 3, D-81543 Muenchen, Germany; 
FAX +49 89 62269404; 
http://www.lincom-europa.com
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.
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Thursday, September 21, 2000
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