LINGUIST List 11.2281

Fri Oct 20 2000

TOC: Journal of Historical Pragmatics

Editor for this issue: Naomi Ogasawara <naomilinguistlist.org>


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  1. Paul Peranteau, Journal of Historical Pragmatics 1:2,2000

Message 1: Journal of Historical Pragmatics 1:2,2000

Date: Thu, 19 Oct 2000 14:51:05 -0400
From: Paul Peranteau <paulbenjamins.com>
Subject: Journal of Historical Pragmatics 1:2,2000


Now Available:

Journal of Historical Pragmatics 1:2 (2000)
� John Benjamins Publishing Company

Articles
Richard J. Watts (pp. 165�173)
Introduction

Jonathan Culpeper and Merja Kyt� (pp. 175�199)
Data in historical pragmatics: Spoken interaction (re)cast as writing

Barbara Kryk-Kastovsky (pp. 201�230)
Representations of orality in Early Modern English trial records

Monika Fludernik (pp. 231�262)
Narrative Discourse Markers in Malory's Morte D'Arthur

Angela Schrott (pp. 263�299)
�Qu� los podri� contar? Interrogative acts in the Cantar de mio Cid: Some 
examples from Old Spanish on asking questions.

Thomas Kohnen (pp. 301�321)
Explicit performatives in Old English: A corpus-based study of directives

Book Reviews
Dirk Geeraerts: Diachronic Prototype Semantics. A Contribution to 
Historical Lexicography (P�ivi Koivisto-Alanko)

ABSTRACTS:

Data in historical pragmatics: Spoken interaction (re)cast as writing
Jonathan Culpeper and Merja Kyt�

In this paper we examine four speech-related text types in terms of how 
linguistically close they are to spoken face-to-face interaction. Our
"conversational" diagnostics include lexical repetitions, question marks 
(as an indicator of question-answer adjacency pairs), interruptions, and
several single word interactive features (first- and second-person 
pronouns, private verbs and demonstrative pronouns). We discuss the nature of
these diagnostics and then consider their distribution across our text 
types and across the period 1600 to 1720. We reveal: (1) a differential
distribution across our text types (and suggest a number of explanatory 
factors), and (2) a shift over our period towards features associated with
spoken face-to-face interaction (and make the tentative suggestion that 
this finding may be due to the development of "popular" literatures). We
also make some preliminary remarks about our Shakespeare sample.

Representations of orality in Early Modern English trial records
Barbara Kryk-Kastovsky

The paper aims at answering some questions essential for a historical
pragmaticist. It examines to what extent the written records available
nowadays reflect the language spoken in the past, i.e. what their
degree of orality is. The data are two Early Modern English texts: The
trial of Titus Oates and The trial of Lady Alice Lisle. Trial records
are relevant for this analysis since they are closer to the original
sources than other texts and they are interesting for linguistic
reasons, e.g. the formulaic expressions or the discourse strategies
used in court. The search for traces of orality is based on two
features: turn-taking and closeness to the sociocultural context. The
study corroborates my initial hypothesis that the two trial records
have preserved many traces of orality. Moreover, they are rich sources
of information about the political, social and cultural life of the
period.

Narrative Discourse Markers in Malory's Morte D'Arthur
Monika Fludernik

On the basis of the model of narrative structure proposed in Fludernik 
(1996b) this paper presents the results of an investigation of discourse
markers in Thomas Malory's Morte D'Arthur, with a complete line-by-line 
analysis of The Tale of King Arthur, Books I to III ("Merlin"; "Balin";
"Torre and Pellinor"), A Noble Tale of Sir Launcelot du Lake, and The Book 
of Sir Tristram de Lyones (Book XIV: "Launcelot and Elaine"). The paper
argues that the inflation of discourse markers in Malory is a sign of their 
imminent disappearance from narrative prose and that other features that
indicate a dissolution of the oral narrative episode pattern are also 
visible in the text.

�Qu� los podri� contar? Interrogative acts in the Cantar de mio Cid: Some 
examples from Old Spanish on asking questions.
Angela Schrott

The study of interrogative acts in the Old Spanish Cantar de mio Cid is 
based on the premise that speech acts not only have to be located in the
context of dialogue interaction but also in the frame of the traditions 
that mark the (literary) text. Because of this context dependency the pragmatic
profile of interrogative acts has to be worked out by means of close 
philological interpretations. After sketching some methodological premises and
a definition of the interrogative act, two question types are described in 
detail: the rhetorical question and a phatic use of the where-question. The
analysis illustrates how the interrogative power of questions is shaped by 
the dialogue context and demonstrates the impact of text traditions like
narrative techniques. Thus, the twofold contextualization of the 
interrogative acts shows the need for an interdisciplinary analysis that 
integrates
sociohistorical considerations as well as literary reflections.

Explicit performatives in Old English: A corpus-based study of directives
Thomas Kohnen

This article deals with directive performatives in Old English. Using the 
Old English section of the Helsinki Corpus, it examines their frequency, their
distribution across text types and their major functions. In addition, the 
data are compared with their Latin sources and with the frequency of
directive performatives in the Modern English LOB Corpus. The results 
suggest that directive performatives were much more frequent in Old
English, with Modern English showing a clear tendency to avoid 
face-threatening performatives.


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