LINGUIST List 11.2550

Sun Nov 26 2000

Qs: Rhythm/Speech/Music, Prepositions/German

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Aniruddh Patel, rhythm in speech and music
  2. C.F. Hempelmann, Stranded Prepositions in Northern German Dialects

Message 1: rhythm in speech and music

Date: Tue, 21 Nov 2000 14:00:09 -0800
From: Aniruddh Patel <apatelnsi.edu>
Subject: rhythm in speech and music

Dear List,

I'm looking for articles which examine the imprint of linguistic rhythm
on the instrumental music of a culture.

I am familiar with Brian J. Wenk's 1987 paper, "Just in time: on speech
rhythms in music", Linguistics 25:969-981.

I would be grateful for any suggestions for further papers along these
lines, especially empirical studies.

Thanks, and Happy Thanksgiving,

Ani Patel

- 
Aniruddh D. Patel			
The Neurosciences Institute		 
10640 John Jay Hopkins Drive
San Diego, CA 92121

Tel	858-626-2085
Fax	858-626-2099
Email	apatelnsi.edu
Website	http://www.nsi.edu/users/patel
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Message 2: Stranded Prepositions in Northern German Dialects

Date: Mon, 20 Nov 2000 21:31:04 -0500
From: C.F. Hempelmann <hempelmapurdue.edu>
Subject: Stranded Prepositions in Northern German Dialects



	
		
	Dear list-members,
	
	Being originally from Northern Germany and remembering being teased 
	for it, I'd like to share any references on the following phenomenon.
	
	I am working on contracted prepositional pronouns, formed with 
	"da(r)-" and prepositions "um," "ueber," "von," etc:
	darum (for that), darueber (over that), davon (of that), dafuer (for 
	that), darunter (under that), darin/dadrin (in that), etc. 
	
	When fronted, in standard German they are inseparable, while in 
	certain dialects they are separable and the preposition is stranded, 
	like in English
	
	1. a. Ich weiss nichts davon.
	 I know nothing that-of
	 b. Davon weiss ich nichts t. (standard)
	 c. Da weiss ich nichts von. (dialectal)
	
	2. a. Davon kann nicht die Rede sein.
	 b. Es kann nicht die Rede davon sein.
	 c. Da kann nicht die Rede von sein.
	 d. Da kann nicht von die Rede sein.
	(Especially (2d) seems to be acceptable only very locally.)
	
	Summary will be posted.
	
	Thanks,
	Christian F. Hempelmann
	Interdepartmental Program in Linguistics
	Purdue University
	Heavilon Hall
	West Lafayette, IN 47907
	e-mail hempelmapurdue.edu
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