LINGUIST List 11.2583

Thu Nov 30 2000

TOC: Journal of Asian Pacific Communication

Editor for this issue: Naomi Ogasawara <naomilinguistlist.org>


Directory

  1. Paul Peranteau, Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, 10:1, 2000

Message 1: Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, 10:1, 2000

Date: Wed, 29 Nov 2000 13:29:09 -0500
From: Paul Peranteau <paulbenjamins.com>
Subject: Journal of Asian Pacific Communication, 10:1, 2000


Journal of Asian Pacific Communication 10:1 (2000)

� John Benjamins Publishing Company

Articles
Keiko Okumura and Li Wei (pp. 1-24)
The concept of self and apology strategies in two cultures

Yuling Pan (pp. 25161)
Facework in Chinese service encounters

Fei Loi Lai and Bryce T. McIntyre (pp. 63-78)
The Internet in Macau: A case study of telecommunications structure and
policy in a former Portuguese colonial enclave

Rey G. Rosales and Dennis T. Lowry (pp. 79-91)
Online news framing: A content analysis of the coverage of three Manila
online newspapers during the 1998 Philippine presidential election

Jennifer M. Wei (pp. 93-114)
An analysis of the metaphorical usage of campaign slogans in the 1996
presidential campaign in Taiwan

Dan Lu and Yin Yee Au-Yeung (pp. 115-133)
Putonghua: A mirror to reflect Hong Kong youths' emotions

Yihong Gao, Xinchun Su and Lei Zhou (pp. 135-153)
Pre-handover language attitudes in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Guangzhou

Jun Liu (pp. 155-189)
Understanding Asian students' oral participation modes in American
classrooms

Book Reviews
Jun Xing: Asian American Through the Lens: Representations, Identity (John
Lent)
 ------------------------------------------------------------------------

ABSTRACTS:

The concept of self and apology strategies in two cultures
Keiko Okumura and Li Wei

The speech act of apologising aims at maintaining, restoring and enhancing
interpersonal relationships. Most of the existing studies of apology in
different languages and cultures follow the Brown and Levinson (1987)
approach and describe apology as a 'negative politeness' strategy. In this
paper, we study the use of apology by two groups of women from Japanese and
British cultural backgrounds, in conjunction with an examination of the
cultural conception of 'self'. Using both standard test (Twenty Statements
Test, TST) and questionnaire data, we demonstrate that important
differences exist in the self concept of the two groups, and these
differences are reflected in and impact on the women's use of apologies in
social interaction.

Facework in Chinese service encounters
Yuling Pan

This study investigates politeness phenomena in Chinese service encounters,
contrasting the use of facework in two types of service encounters:
state-run vs. privately-owned stores. I argue that politeness is a dynamic
process, which involves participants' perception of a social setting and
the assumed interpersonal relationship in a given situation. It is shown
that social distance and the type of social relationship play an essential
role in Chinese politeness behavior and that the use of facework in service
encounters signals a change in discursive practice due to social and
economic changes in China.

The Internet in Macau: A case study of telecommunications structure and
policy in a former Portuguese colonial enclave
Fei Loi Lai and Bryce T. McIntyre

Macau is a 400-year-old Portuguese colony in the Pearl River Delta in
southeastern China. Portugal returned the colony to China on 20 December
1999. In light of its history, Macau is an interesting case study of how
colonial policies affect adoption of new technologies such as the
Internet.Companhia de Telcomunica��es de Macau is the only company licensed
to provide telecommunications services in Macau. This study examines: (1)
the relationship between the Macau government and CTM as an ISP; (2) the
relationship between CTM and other Internet companies in Macau; and (3) the
relationship between Internet companies and users in Macau.

Online news framing: A content analysis of the coverage of three Manila
online newspapers during the 1998 Philippine presidential election
Rey G. Rosales and Dennis T. Lowry

This study examined how three Manila online newspapers framed the coverage
of the 1998 Philippine presidential election. It analyzed election news
content (N = 367 stories) in terms of tone of coverage, manner of
candidate's publicity, and the frames used in presenting election news. The
results showed positive election news (55%) and favorable (76%) publicity
towards the candidates. The dailies used more strategy frames (56%) than
issue frames (44%). It was also found that a newspaper can use more
in-depth analysis (issue frames) in its coverage and still remain on top of
the readership and circulation game. Furthermore, the attribution of the
causes and solutions to an issue was not assigned to a candidate but rather
to an institution, lending support to Iyengar's (1991) episodic-thematic
framing analysis.

An analysis of the metaphorical usage of campaign slogans in the 1996
presidential campaign in Taiwan
Jennifer M. Wei

This paper explores a variety of metaphors notably, war, revenge, and a
journey of spirituality awakening -- used by the 1996 presidential and
vice-presidential candidates in Taiwan. It uses the 1996 presidential
election rhetoric as a case study to analyze how political ideologies,
tactics and strategies are incorporated in metaphors in presidential
slogans. It adopts Lakoff & Johnson (1980)'s proposal of metaphor as
symbols that orient our perception and influence how we structure our
actions. Kennedy (1998)'s treaties on political rhetoric are introduced as
theoretical background for further analysis, following a short sketch of
the socio-political context of recent democratic developments in Taiwan.
Studies of the election rhetoric, its contributions and limitations are
then examined. Data for analysis were collected from newspapers, official
memoranda and pamphlets available to the public over the campaign period,
roughly from late January to late March in 1996. The results show overlaps
and contrasts of metaphorical usage among the four sets of candidates. In
conclusion, metaphorical usage not only orients the campaign style of the
candidates but also shapes voters' perceptions of proposed political
ideals.

Putonghua: A mirror to reflect Hong Kong youths' emotions
Dan Lu and Yin Yee Au-Yeung

Putonghua, the official Chinese language of mainland China, has become an
intriguing topic for language researchers and teachers in Hong Kong. This
study involved 275 Form VI (Grade 12) students in Hong Kong. The twin
research questions are to investigate the subjects' general attitudes
toward the use of Putonghua in Hong Kong contexts as well as the learning
of the language. The research is qualitative in nature and discusses the
data through statistical analysis. The major findings are: (1) on the whole
the subjects are instrumentally motivated to learn Putonghua; (2) subjects'
learning motivation is related to their political and cultural identity;
(3) subjects still give more preference to English over Putonghua; (4)
currently it is premature to greatly expand the use of Putonghua in
education and other social domains such as government affairs. Based on
these findings, the paper poses critical comments on Pierson's study (1991,
1998). It seems clear that the spread of Putonghua in Hong Kong lacks a
social and psychological support currently. The spread can occur only on a
logical and incremental basis in tandem with a titanic effort to produce
qualified, competent local teachers in order to teach this target language.

Pre-handover language attitudes in Hong Kong, Beijing, and Guangzhou
Yihong Gao, Xinchun Su and Lei Zhou

In May 1997, a matched guise test was conducted on 304 college students in
Hong Kong, Beijing, and Guangzhou. The stimulus material was presented in 4
guises: Cantonese, English, Putonghua, and Putonghua with Cantonese accent.
Major findings: (1) What distinguished Hong Kong subjects' sociolinguistic
identity was not Cantonese, English or Putonghua as found in previous
studies, but Putonghua with Cantonese accent. In light of Brewer's (1991)
optimal distinctiveness theory, this would suggest parallel needs of "being
Chinese" and "being Hongkongers." (2) Guangzhou was closer to Beijing
rather than to Hong Kong in language attitudes. The cutting boundary
appeared between the mainland and Hong Kong, not between Cantonese-speaking
and non-Cantonese-speaking communities.

Understanding Asian students' oral participation modes in American
classrooms
Jun Liu

Second language acquisition (SLA) researchers have not adequately explored
English as a Second Language (ESL) students' use of English in academic
settings other than the language classroom. Social contexts of language
learning, such as students' content course classrooms, affect not only the
amount and the type of input learners receive, but also the extent to which
learners are able to engage in meaningful real-life communication in the
target language. An increasing educational concern in American academic
settings is some ESL students' minimization of the importance of verbal
communication in their content courses. To challenge the linguistic
explanation of the inability of ESL students to adapt to active oral
participation modes in their content courses, this study, by focusing on
Asian graduate students in different majors in a US university, examined
multiple pertinent factors affecting their oral participation modes via
both classroom observations and interviews. Sociocultural, linguistic,
cognitive, affective, and pedagogical/environmental factors were found to
influence these students' oral communication in their content courses, with
socio-cultural factors exerting the largest influence on students'
classroom reticence. Directions for further research are recommended.




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