LINGUIST List 11.282

Thu Feb 10 2000

Jobs: Visual Lang. Perception, Speech-Lang. Pathology

Editor for this issue: Naomi Ogasawara <naomilinguistlist.org>


Directory

  1. Professor Tim Jordan, Visual Language Perception: PhD scholarship at U of Nottingham, UK
  2. Quynh Tran, Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology: Assistant Prof. at New York Univ.

Message 1: Visual Language Perception: PhD scholarship at U of Nottingham, UK

Date: 9 Feb 2000 11:51:30 -0000
From: Professor Tim Jordan <Tim.Jordannottingham.ac.uk>
Subject: Visual Language Perception: PhD scholarship at U of Nottingham, UK


Rank of Job: PhD scholarship
Areas Required: Visual language perception 
Other Desired Areas: cognitive science, neuroscience, computer science or
mathematics
University or Organization: University of Nottingham
Department: Psychology
State or Province: England
Country: U.K.
Final Date of Application: April 3rd
Contact: Professor Tim Jordan Tim.Jordannottingham.ac.uk

Address for Applications:
University Park
Nottingham
England NG7 2RD
U.K.

HUMAN PERCEPTION AND COMMUNICATION RESEARCH GROUP
SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY
UNIVERSITY OF NOTTINGHAM

Applications are invited for a fully-funded PhD scholarship to work on
any of several topics in human visual perception and cognition. These
topics include written word perception, visual and audiovisual speech
perception, and hemispheric differences in visual language perception. 
Scholarships may also involve links with BT Research Laboratories, if
appropriate, to guide the development of virtual reality and
telecommunications technology. Applicants should have a degree in
psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, computer science or
mathematics and will join a well-funded and growing group of researchers
in human visual perception and cognition. Informal enquiries can be
made to Professor Tim Jordan at the School of Psychology, University of
Nottingham by telephone (0115 951 4384) or e-mail
(trjpsych.nottingham.ac.uk). Web page:
http://www.psychology.nottingham.ac.uk/staff/Tim.Jordan/

Application forms can be obtained from the Psychology postgraduate
secretary, Ms Claudia Reale <crpsychology.nottingham.ac.uk>
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Message 2: Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology: Assistant Prof. at New York Univ.

Date: Wed, 9 Feb 2000 15:26:43 -0500
From: Quynh Tran <quynh.trannyu.edu>
Subject: Speech-Language Pathology/Audiology: Assistant Prof. at New York Univ.


New York University
Assistant Professor
Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
School of Education

Tenure-track position in the Department of Speech-Language Pathology and
Audiology. The Department grants an undergraduate major, master's, and
doctoral degrees, and has a full-time Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic.
The Department is in a growth phase, with goals that include revising and
expanding the curricular offerings, developing an active research laboratory
and a collaborative research program, and increasing the base of funded
projects.

Qualifications:

Applicants must possess a Doctoral Degree in Communicative Disorders or a
related discipline, and have strong evidence of 1) a commitment to graduate
and undergraduate education and 2) excellence in scholarly research.
Experience with grant proposals and with university teaching is highly
desirable, and the CCC-SLP is desirable but not required.

Responsibilities:

The positions involve teaching graduate and undergraduate courses in speech
science, voice, language disorders, broadly defined, and related areas;
advising students; conducting personal research; directing graduate student
research

Review of applications will begin on March 15, 2000, and will continue until
position is filled. Applicants should submit their curriculum vitae, copies
of three relevant papers, and names and contact information of four
references to:

Diana Van Lancker, Ph.D., Chair
Department of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology
719 Broadway, Suite 200
New York, NY 10003
212-998-5261
diana.vanlanckernyu.edu
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