LINGUIST List 11.650

Wed Mar 22 2000

Qs: Typology Research, Strong Crossover Task

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Johannes Reese, Typology research based on L. Talmy
  2. William J. Crawford, strong crossover task

Message 1: Typology research based on L. Talmy

Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2000 15:33:04 +0100
From: Johannes Reese <reesejuni-muenster.de>
Subject: Typology research based on L. Talmy

Does anyone know about further research that is based on either

Leonard Talmy (1985): Lexicalization patterns: semantic structure in
lexical forms, in: Timothy Shopen (ed.): Language typology and syntactic
description, vol. III: Grammatical categories and the lexicon.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 57-149

or

Mary Snell-Hornby (1983): Verb-descriptivity in German and English. A
contrastive study in semantic fields. Heidelberg: Carl Winter.

Thanks in advance,

Johannes Reese

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Message 2: strong crossover task

Date: Tue, 21 Mar 2000 12:33:46 -0600
From: William J. Crawford <wcrawforfacstaff.wisc.edu>
Subject: strong crossover task

In the absence of any (known) test, I am currently working on a 
grammaticality judgment task involving knowledge of the strong 
crossover phenomenon in wh-questions and relative clauses. I am 
particularly interested in a task suitable for adult second language 
learners of English. I have two questions:

1. Does anyone know of an existing task suitable for my purpose?

2. Would anyone be willing to look at my task and provide any 
suggestions/comments?

Thanks in advance. I'll post a summary if the need arises.

William J. Crawford
Lecturer, Department of English
University of Wisconsin, Madison
wcrawforfacstaff.wisc.edu
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