LINGUIST List 11.75

Mon Jan 17 2000

Calls: Indigenous American Lang, SYNTAX in the SCHOOLS

Editor for this issue: Jody Huellmantel <jodylinguistlist.org>


As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text.

Directory

  1. Gregory L Brown, Workshop on Indigenous American Languages (WAIL)
  2. Rebecca Wheeler, SYNTAX in the SCHOOLS

Message 1: Workshop on Indigenous American Languages (WAIL)

Date: Fri, 14 Jan 2000 14:20:39 -0800 (PST)
From: Gregory L Brown <glb2umail.ucsb.edu>
Subject: Workshop on Indigenous American Languages (WAIL)



WORKSHOP ON AMERICAN INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES - SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS

 Santa Barbara, CA
 April 14-16, 2000

The linguistics department at the University of California, Santa Barbara
announces its third annual Workshop on American Indigenous Languages
(WAIL), a forum for the discussion of theoretical and descriptive
linguistic studies of indigenous languages of the Americas.

Anonymous abstracts are invited for talks on any topic in Native American
linguistics. Talks will be 20 minutes, followed by 10 minutes for
discussion. Individuals may submit abstracts for one single and one
co-authored paper. Abstracts should be 500 words or less and can submitted
by hard copy or e-mail. For hard copy submissions, please send five copies
of your abstract and a 3x5 card with the following information: (1) name;
(2) affiliation; (3) mailing address; (4) phone number; (5) e-mail
address; (6) title of your paper.

Send hard copy submissions to:
Workshop on American Indigenous Languages
Department of Linguistics
University of California, Santa Barbara
Santa Barbara, CA 93106

E-mail submissions are encouraged. Include the information from the 3x5
card (above) in the body of the e-mail message, with the anonymous
abstract as an attachment.

Send e-mail submissions to: 
wailhumanitas.ucsb.edu

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF ABSTRACTS: January 30, 2000
Notification of acceptance will be by e-mail by February 15, 2000.

For further information contact the conference coordinator at
wailhumanitas.ucsb.edu or (805) 893-3776
or check out our web site at

http://linguistics.ucsb.edu/events/wail/wail.html\



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Message 2: SYNTAX in the SCHOOLS

Date: Sat, 15 Jan 2000 13:23:44 -0500 (EST)
From: Rebecca Wheeler <rwheelercnu.edu>
Subject: SYNTAX in the SCHOOLS



CALL FOR PAPERS: __SYNTAX in the SCHOOLS__

__Syntax in the Schools__, a quarterly newsletter published by the
Assembly for the Teaching of English Grammar (ATEG), an Assembly of the
National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), seeks to foster discussion
and analysis of the teaching of English grammar at all grade levels -- K -
16. We solicit articles which describe, analyze and/or critique any and
all aspects of the teaching of grammar in our schools. For example, areas
to be considered include but are not limited to

 * classroom practices in the teaching of grammar
 * traditional vs. linguistic approaches to grammar
 * why we should (or should not) teach what grammar
 * how we should teach that grammar
 * how we handle language varieties in the classroom 
	(AAVE, Appalachian English, Dominant Variety English 
	[AKA Standard English], etc.)
 * teacher education as relevant to the teaching of grammar
 * integrating grammar into writing, reading, and/or literature, etc.

On these matters, we welcome articles, reports from the schools and from
teacher education programs, as well as book reviews, textbook
evaluations, etc.

_______________________________

The Winter 2000 issue of Syntax in the Schools invites, in addition to the
above areas, consideration of State Standards of Learning regarding
grammar, as described below.

Notice of Special Issue: Winter 2000

STANDARDS OF LEARNING and THE TEACHING OF GRAMMAR

State Standards of Learning are sweeping across the nation, demanding
allegiance in our school classrooms. As teachers coming under ever
increasing scrutiny for what our students learn and how they perform on
state constructed standardized tests, we face new challenges in the
language arts classroom. For example, we must surely wonder how to keep
our classrooms alive, how to engage our students in authentic language
experience and discovery, all the while crafting that experience to assure
their success on state school exit exams. What have been your classroom
experiences and/or reflections regarding State standards for student
performance in grammar? We invite you address these concerns in the Winter
2000 issue of Syntax in the Schools. 

We are accepting submissions on this and other topics now.

Please send submissions (both hard and soft copy [Microsoft Word in Mac
readable format]) to

 Rebecca S. Wheeler
 Assistant Professor
 Department of English
 Christopher Newport University
 1 University Place
 Newport News, VA 23606-2998

RE: SYNTAX IN THE SCHOOLS

 Office phone: (757) 594-8891
 Email: 	 rwheelercnu.edu
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