LINGUIST List 12.1248

Sat May 5 2001

Books: Slavic linguistics, Semitic linguistics

Editor for this issue: Naomi Ogasawara <naomilinguistlist.org>


Links to the websites of all LINGUIST's supporting publishers are available at the end of this issue.

Directory

  1. LINCOM EUROPA, Slavic linguistics: Genesis of the Slovak Literary Language
  2. LINCOM EUROPA, Semitic ling: Comparative Morphology of Standard & Egyptian Arabic

Message 1: Slavic linguistics: Genesis of the Slovak Literary Language

Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 20:09:55 +0200
From: LINCOM EUROPA <LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de>
Subject: Slavic linguistics: Genesis of the Slovak Literary Language

Genesis of the Slovak Literary Language

KONSTANTIN VASILIEVICH LIFANOV
Lomonosov State University of Moscow

Contrary to Slovak historical linguistics, the Slovak Literary
Language did not arise in the 18th century as a result of Anton
Bernolak's codification of the West Slovak dialect. It developed
gradually, over a much longer period of time from the Old Czech
Literary Language, which was adopted by the Slovaks as their own
written medium as early as by the end of the 14th century. As a result
of its interaction with mainly the West Slovak dialect, its specific
Slovak version arose in the 15th century. By the 1630s, this written
standard acquired the features of an original literary language,
separate from the literary language based on the Prague standard.

However, since the first decades of the 17th century, a further
development of this written standard was complicated by the
Counter-Reformation. The use of the literary language followed
different paths among the Lutherans and among the Catholics. The Old
Slovak Literary Language attained a high degree of development among
the Catholics. Rich and varied spiritual literature was written in
this language, including a translation of the Bible in 1750,
high-quality secular baroque poetry, etc. In the 1780s, this standard
was codified by Bernolak. Diglossia emerged among the Lutherans. They
used both the Czech Literary Language and the Old Slovak Literary
Language. However, they did not perceive the latter one as a literary
norm and considered it acceptable only in the "low" kinds of
literature -- e.g., in popular poetry -- and in administrative and
legal documents. This diglossia was not abolished until the 1820s,
which opened the way for Ludovit Stur's codification of the Modern
Slovak Literary Language based on the Central Slovak folklore koine.

Contents: 

Introduction. 
Chapter 1. The main thesis of the general theory of literary language. 
Chapter 2. The formation of specific idiom functioning in Catholic 
 spiritual literature of the XVIth - XVIIIth centuries and 
 Bernolak's codification. 
Chapter 3. Interrelation of Catholic "high" poetry language of 
 the XVIIth - XVIIIth centuries and the language of spiritual 
 literature. 
Chapter 4. The character of territorial differentiation and the evolution 
	 of the language of Slovak administrative-legal documents. 
Chapter 5. Central Slovak koine and the language of poetry from the end 
 	 of XVIIIth to the beginning of the XIXth centuries. 
Chapter 6. A new concept of the genesis of the Slovak Literary language. 
Conclusion. [written in Russian]

ISBN 3 89586 442 0. 
LINCOM Studies in Slavic Linguistics 21.
Ca. 220pp. USD 70 / DM 128 / � 44.

New: A Students' and course discount of 40% is offered to the above
 title. 

Free copies of LINCOM's newsflashes 24 and 25 are now
available from LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.

LINCOM EUROPA, Freibadstr. 3, D-81543 Muenchen, Germany;
FAX +49 89 62269404;
http://www.lincom-europa.com
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: Semitic ling: Comparative Morphology of Standard & Egyptian Arabic

Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 22:29:19 +0200
From: LINCOM EUROPA <LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de>
Subject: Semitic ling: Comparative Morphology of Standard & Egyptian Arabic

Comparative Morphology of Standard and Egyptian Arabic
Hassan A. H. Gadalla, Assiut University

The major concern of this book is the comparison of the morphological
aspects of Standard Arabic (SA) and Egyptian Arabic (EA). It is
divided into five chapters. Chapter One provides a phonological
outline of SA and EA. It also analyses morphological basics and the
morphosyntactic preliminaries of the two varieties. Chapter Two is
devoted to the morphology of triradical and quadriradical verbs. In
addition, the inflection of verbs for aspect/mood and voice and a
treatment of verbal affixes and verb derivation are provided.

Chapter Three deals with the morphology of primary and deverbal nouns.
Moreover, the divergence between definite and indefinite nouns and the
inflection of nouns for case, gender and number are explained. The
formation of the diminutive is also illustrated. Chapter Four handles
the morphology of adjectival stems. Then, the difference between
definite and indefinite adjectives and the inflection of adjectives
for case, gender, number and degree are analyzed. Furthermore,
participial forms and relational adjectives are discussed. Chapter
Five is related to the morphology of closed-list classes, including
pronouns, prepositions, adverbs, as well as interrogative and
responsive particles. Finally, negative and possessive particles are
exhibited.

ISBN 3 89586 972 4. 
LINCOM Studies in Afro-Asiatic Linguistics 05. 
Ca. 260pp. DM 128 / USD 65 / � 42. 
2nd printing!

Please ask for course discounts!
 
New: A Students' and course discount of 40% is offered to the above
 title. 

Free copies of LINCOM's newsflashes 24 and 25 are now
available from LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.

LINCOM EUROPA, Freibadstr. 3, D-81543 Muenchen, Germany;
FAX +49 89 62269404;
http://www.lincom-europa.com
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue
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Tuesday, April 24, 2001

 

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