LINGUIST List 12.1249

Sat May 5 2001

Books: Romance linguistics, Chinese linguistics

Editor for this issue: Naomi Ogasawara <naomilinguistlist.org>


Links to the websites of all LINGUIST's supporting publishers are available at the end of this issue.

Directory

  1. LINCOM EUROPA, Romance linguistics: Lexicon of Sark Norman French by Liddicoat
  2. LINCOM EUROPA, Chinese linguistics: A Grammar of Mandarin Chinese by Hua Lin

Message 1: Romance linguistics: Lexicon of Sark Norman French by Liddicoat

Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 19:49:55 +0200
From: LINCOM EUROPA <LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de>
Subject: Romance linguistics: Lexicon of Sark Norman French by Liddicoat

Lexicon of Sark Norman French
Anthony J. Liddicoat, Griffith University

Sark Norman French (SNF) is a Norman French variety spoken on the
island of Sark, the smallest of the Channel Islands. The variety is
spoken by fewer than 50 people and is in a state of obsolescence. SNF
was established on Sark in the sixteenth century by a group of mainly
Jersey Norman French speakers, but then evolved in relative isolation
until late nineteenth century.

SNF is a very conservative Norman French variety, which unlike
mainland Norman French has not been strongly influenced by standard
French lexis, although in recent years, there has been large scale
borrowing from English. The dictionary gives English language
equivalents for each SNF term, along with grammatical information and
etymologies for each entry. There is also an English-SNF finder list.

ISBN 3 89586 411 0
Lincom Studies in Romance Linguistics 25
130pp. 24 x 18 cm. DM 98 / USD 48 / � 30


New: A Students' and course discount of 40% is offered to the above
 title. 

Free copies of LINCOM's newsflashes 24 and 25 are now
available from LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.

LINCOM EUROPA, Freibadstr. 3, D-81543 Muenchen, Germany;
FAX +49 89 62269404;
http://www.lincom-europa.com
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: Chinese linguistics: A Grammar of Mandarin Chinese by Hua Lin

Date: Fri, 04 May 2001 22:33:45 +0200
From: LINCOM EUROPA <LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de>
Subject: Chinese linguistics: A Grammar of Mandarin Chinese by Hua Lin

A Grammar of Mandarin Chinese

HUA LIN
University of Victoria

Mandarin Chinese is the official language in China, Taiwan and
Singapore, and the language with the largest number of native
speakers. In recent years, Mandarin usage has spread even further: it
is now taught in most schools in Hong Kong, and with the influx of
immigrants to the West from China and Taiwan, many parts of the world
including Canada, the United States, Australia, and Europe have seen a
steady increase in the number of speakers. Mandarin is not a
homogeneous language; any grammar that tries to describe it needs to
select one region as its focus. In this book, the focus will be on
Mandarin as is spoken in its motherland of Northern China, especially
the Chinese capital of Beijing.

The book will begin by an introduction to the geographic
characteristics, dialects and historical development of the language.
This will be followed by Mandarin phonetics and phonology. Topics
covered include the syllable, tones, the consonants, the vowels, the
glides and, more importantly, how these interact to create the sound
structure of the language. A description of the morphology will
follow, addressing special features of the language in terms of
compounding, reduplication, word stress, and disyllabicity. The
remainder of the book will be devoted to Mandarin syntax. It will
first outline the major parts of speech and the major types of
phrases; then it will focus on some salient syntactic features,
including the topic-comment structure, the serial-verb construction,
and the de construction. The book will end with two sample texts, each
accompanied by interlinear translation and free translation.

Table of Contents:

1	Introduction	
1.1	A Brief History	
1.2	The Chinese Dialects	
1.2.1	The Northern Dialect	
1.2.2	Yue	
1.2.3	Min	
1.2.4	Kejia	
1.2.5 Wu	

2 Phonetcs and Phonology
2.1	The Sounds	
2.1.1	Consonants	
2.1.2	Vowels	
2.2	The SyllableE	
2.2.1	The Initial And the Final	
2.2.2	Phonotactic Constraints	
2.2.2.1	Syllabic Consonants	
2.2.2.2	Syllable Gaps	
2.3	The Processes	
2.3.1	Consonants	
2.3.2	Vowels	
2.3.3	Pinyin and IPA	
2.4	THE TONES	
2.4.1	Basic Tones	
2.4.2	Neutral Tone	

3	Morphology	
3.1	The Morpheme	
3.1.1	Monosyllabicity	
3.1.2	Free and Bound	
3.2	The Word	
3.3	Word Structure	
3.3.1	Affixation	
3.3.1.1	Suffixes	
3.3.1.2	Prefixes	
3.3.2	Compounding	
3.3.2.1	Coordinative Compounds	
3.3.2.2	Endocentric Compounds	
3.3.2.3	Verb-Object Compounds	
3.3.2.4	Verb-Complement Compounds	
3.3.2.5	Subject-Predicate Compounds	
3.3.2.6	Noun-Classifier Compounds	
3.3.2.7	Multisyllabic Compounds	
3.3.2.8	Newer Compounds	
3.3.3	Reduplication	
3.3.3.1	Noun and Classifier Reduplication	
3.3.3.2	Verb and Adjective Reduplication	
3.3.3.3	Two Syllable Reduplication	
3.3.3.4	Simplex or Complex?	
3.3.3.5	Affixation or Compounding?	
3.3.4	Abbreviations	
3.3.5	Disyllabicity	
3.4	Homophones	
3.4.1	Lucky and Taboo Expressions	
3.5	Word Stress	
3.5.1	Meaningful Stress	
3.6	Transliteration of Foreign Words	
3.6.1	Sound Route	
3.6.2	Meaning Route	
3.6.3	Sound and Meaning Combined	
3.6.4 From Cantonese	

4	 Parts of Speech	
4.1.1	 Nouns	
4.1.1.1	 Types of Nouns	
4.1.1.2	 Syntactic Properties	
4.1.2	 Verbs	
4.1.2.1	 Types of Verbs	
4.1.2.2	 Syntactic Properties	
4.1.2.2.1 Action and Stative	
4.1.2.2.2 Transitive and Intransitive Verbs	
4.1.2.2.3 Auxiliary Verbs	
4.1.3	 Adjectives	
4.1.3.1	 Types of Adjectives	
4.1.3.2	 Syntactic Properties	
4.1.4	 Numbers	
4.1.4.1	 Types of Numbers	
4.1.4.1.1 Whole Numbers	
4.1.4.1.2 Fractions, Decimals, Multiples and Ordinal Numbers	
4.1.4.1.3 Approximate Numbers	
4.1.4.2	 Syntactic Properties	
4.1.5	 Classifiers	
4.1.5.1	 Types of Classifiers	
4.1.5.2	 Syntactic Propertie	
4.1.6	 Pronouns	
4.1.6.1	 Types of Pronouns	
4.1.6.2	 Syntactic Properties	
4.1.7	 Adverbs	
4.1.7.1	 Types of Adverbs	
4.1.7.2	 Syntactic Properties	
4.1.8	 Prepositions	
4.1.8.1	 Types of Prepositions	
4.1.8.2	 Syntactic Properties	
4.1.9	 Conjunctions	
4.1.9.1	 Types of Conjunctions	
4.1.9.2	 Syntactic Properties	
4.1.10	 Auxiliary Particles	
4.1.10.1 Types of Auxiliary Particles	
4.1.10.2 Syntactic Properties	

5	Syntax	
5.1	General Characteristics	
5.2	Phrases	
5.2.1	Noun Phrases	
5.2.1.1	Coordinate NP	
5.2.1.2	Endocentric NP	
5.2.2	Verb Phrases	
5.2.2.1	Coordinate VP	
5.2.2.2	Endocentric VP	
5.2.2.3	Verb-Object VP	
5.2.2.4	Verb-Complement VP	
5.2.2.5	Serial-Verb VP	
5.2.3	Adjective Phrases	
5.2.3.1	Coordinate AP	
5.2.3.2	Endocentric AP	
5.2.3.3	Adjective-Complement AP	
5.2.4	Prepositional Phrase	
5.2.4.1	With Nominal Objects	
5.2.4.2	With Verbal Objects	
5.2.4.3	Ba PP	
5.2.4.4	Bei PP	
5.3	Functional Components	
5.3.1	Subjects	
5.3.2	Predicates	
5.3.3	Objects	
5.3.4	Attributives	
5.3.5	Adverbials	
5.3.6	Complements	
5.3.7 Functional Usage of Various Words and Phrases	
5.3.7.1	Nominals	
5.3.7.2	Verbs and VPs	
5.3.7.3	Adjectives and APs	
5.3.7.4	PPs	
5.3.7.5	Adverbs	
5.3.7.6	Numbers	
5.4	Aspects and Negation	
5.4.1	The Perfective Aspect	
5.4.2	The Experiential Aspect	
5.4.3	The Progressive Aspect	
5.4.4	Negation	
5.5	Interrogative Sentences	
5.5.1	Yes-or-No Questions	
5.5.2	Wh-Questions	
5.5.3	Choice and Counterfactual Questions	
5.6	Complex Sentences	
5.6.1	Coordinate Complex Sentences	
5.6.2	Endocentric Complex Sentences

ISBN 3 89586 642 3. 
Languages of the World/Materials 344. 
Ca. 200 pp. USD 45 / DM 92 / � 29


Please ask for course discounts!
 
New: A Students' and course discount of 40% is offered to the above
 title. 

Free copies of LINCOM's newsflashes 24 and 25 are now
available from LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.

LINCOM EUROPA, Freibadstr. 3, D-81543 Muenchen, Germany;
FAX +49 89 62269404;
http://www.lincom-europa.com
LINCOM.EUROPAt-online.de.
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue
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Tuesday, April 24, 2001

 

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