LINGUIST List 12.2750

Sat Nov 3 2001

Qs: Switchboard Software, English Grammar History

Editor for this issue: Renee Galvis <reneelinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Caroline Smith, posting: PC tools for Switchboard corpus
  2. Mcneel, Roselyn, query: he is come vs he has come

Message 1: posting: PC tools for Switchboard corpus

Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 15:37:03 -0700
From: Caroline Smith <carolineunm.edu>
Subject: posting: PC tools for Switchboard corpus

Has anyone developed software tools for working with the
Switchboard corpus on a PC or Macintosh? Specifically, I
am interested in being able to display the time-aligned
transcription with the waveform.
(The programs supplied by the LDC assume a Unix platform.)

Please reply to carolineunm.edu.
Thank you!

Caroline L. Smith
Department of Linguistics
University of New Mexico
Humanities 526
Albuquerque, NM 87131-1196

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Message 2: query: he is come vs he has come

Date: Thu, 1 Nov 2001 16:51:00 -700
From: Mcneel, Roselyn <lynnmsua.nmsu.edu>
Subject: query: he is come vs he has come

I am doing a paper on the various uses of the auxiliary verb "to have"
in four languages, including English, and I need to know how and when
the following change came about. In early 19th century writings, one
finds "My father is gone up to town" or "He is come", as one still
does in French and German. When did we start using "have" almost
exclusively for this purpose in English?

Roselyn McNeel
lynnmsua.nmsu.edu
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