LINGUIST List 13.2157

Fri Aug 23 2002

Diss: Translation: Clifford "Evaluating..."

Editor for this issue: Karolina Owczarzak <karolinalinguistlist.org>


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  1. andrew.clifford, Translation: Clifford "Evaluating the Content Validity..."

Message 1: Translation: Clifford "Evaluating the Content Validity..."

Date: Thu, 22 Aug 2002 13:57:10 +0000
From: andrew.clifford <andrew.cliffordrogers.com>
Subject: Translation: Clifford "Evaluating the Content Validity..."


New Dissertation Abstract

Institution: University of Ottawa
Program: School of Information Technology and Engineering
Dissertation Status: Completed
Degree Date: 2002

Author: Andrew F. Clifford 

Dissertation Title: 
Evaluating the Content Validity of Score Interpretations in
Interpreter Certification

Linguistic Field: Translation

Subject Language: French

Dissertation Director 1: Roda Roberts
Dissertation Director 2: Carol Miles
Dissertation Director 3: Sylvie Lambert
Dissertation Director 4: Valerie Dively


Dissertation Abstract: 

In Canada, professional interpreter associations regularly use
certification tests to verify that interpreters have the abilities
needed for practice. Several such tests are well established, having
been administered for a number of years. However, there is little
information on the quality of these tests. It is unclear to what
extent interpreter certification tests are adequately constructed, or
to what extent the decisions made from the tests are accurate.

It is also not clear whether reserach in Translation and Interpreting
Studies alone can address these issues. While this young discipline
has begun to examine the issue of assessment, there has been very
little research in Translation and Interpreting Studies on two related
concepts - measurement and evaluation.

In order to examine these concepts in the context of interpreting,
this thesis proposes a case study of interpreter certification
exams. The thesis focusses specifically on the question of content
validity by examining the standards of test development, the
competencies needed for interpreting, and related issues of test
quality.

This research has both scientific and social benefits. It will offer
insight into an area largely unexamined by Translation and
Interpreting Studies, and it will offer a fresh perspective from which
to view measurement and evaluation. The research will also be of
interest to the interpreting profession.
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