LINGUIST List 13.2217

Wed Sep 4 2002

Qs: "shm-reduplication", Subj. Agreement Morphology

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Bert Vaux, shm-reduplication survey
  2. Eric Fuss, development of subject agreement morphology

Message 1: shm-reduplication survey

Date: Tue, 03 Sep 2002 13:11:12 +0000
From: Bert Vaux <vauxfas.harvard.edu>
Subject: shm-reduplication survey

We have just posted an online survey of shm-reduplication, the process
involved in fancy --> fancy shmancy, Oedipus --> Oedipus shmoedipus,
and so on. If you have intuitions about how to apply shm-reduplication
to new words, we hope you will consider taking the survey. It should
be pretty fun, and will help us out. It's located at:

http://www.ai.mit.edu/projects/dm/shm/

Thanks,
 
Bert Vaux
Department of Linguistics
Harvard University

Andrew Nevins
Department of Linguistics and Philosophy
MIT 

Subject-Language: English, Yiddish; Code: ENG 
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Message 2: development of subject agreement morphology

Date: Wed, 04 Sep 2002 08:06:37 +0000
From: Eric Fuss <fusslingua.uni-frankfurt.de>
Subject: development of subject agreement morphology

Dear all,

I'm currently working on the development of subject agreement
morphology out of pronouns/clitics (and possible syntactic
consequences of this diachronic process such as verb movement,
pro-drop etc.). Does anybody know a language that is currently
undergoing this change -- apart from Mongolian (Comrie 1980),
colloquial French, and colloquial Hebrew (as discussed by Mira Ariel)
-- or has undergone it in its recent(recorded)history? I will of
course post a summary.

Thanks,

Eric Fuss

Institut fuer deutsche Sprache und Literatur II
University of Frankfurt
Germany 
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