LINGUIST List 13.2424

Tue Sep 24 2002

Qs: Ling Analysis of SPAM, Future Tense Use Change

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Directory

  1. Gerrie Soh, Linguistic Analysis of SPAM and gendered emails
  2. Antonio Sposato, diachronic change in usage of the future tenses

Message 1: Linguistic Analysis of SPAM and gendered emails

Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 06:29:47 +0000
From: Gerrie Soh <art90696nus.edu.sg>
Subject: Linguistic Analysis of SPAM and gendered emails

Hi there! 

I'm interested in analysing SPAM for its linguistic features but am at
a loss for relevant research materials/researchers. Aside from
Catherine Ball and her computational linguistical methods for
analysing SPAM, I know of no other researchers involved in this
area. If recommendations could be brought up, that'd be great!

I'm wondering also if you could perhaps suggest other possible
materials in relation to gender in email discourse. I'm only aware of
Susan Herring and her works at the moment

Thanks so much! 
gerrie 
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Message 2: diachronic change in usage of the future tenses

Date: Mon, 23 Sep 2002 18:43:33 +0200
From: Antonio Sposato <antonio.sposatouni-bielefeld.de>
Subject: diachronic change in usage of the future tenses

Hi,

I am an italian student of a german university,

I'm writing a paper about diachronic change in usage of the future
tenses; I'm particularly interested in the reasons about the much
greater use of "will" than "be going to" in both natural conversation
and scripts in our era.

I actually have found a good source about the issue in The English
Corpus Language, but the series are not easy to get in my library, for
they are long-term booked. Could you please suggest me some other
references, books or material online?
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