LINGUIST List 13.256

Wed Jan 30 2002

Qs: Ventriloquists/Labial Consonants, Tense/Lax /i/

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate. In addition to posting a summary, we'd like to remind people that it is usually a good idea to personally thank those individuals who have taken the trouble to respond to the query.

Directory

  1. Carol L. Tenny, ventriloquists and labial consonants
  2. Carol L. Tenny, tense and lax i

Message 1: ventriloquists and labial consonants

Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 20:43:06 -0500 (EST)
From: Carol L. Tenny <tennylinguist.org>
Subject: ventriloquists and labial consonants


One of my students in my intro linguistics class asked today, as we were
finishing up phonetics, how ventriloquists make labial consonants without
moving their lips ???
I love my intro students, they ask such great questions.

Anybody have any idea?

Carol Tenny
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: tense and lax i

Date: Tue, 29 Jan 2002 20:49:11 -0500 (EST)
From: Carol L. Tenny <tennylinguist.org>
Subject: tense and lax i


I discovered to my surprise today that my Intro Linguistics students
overwhelmingly pronounce the vowel in the second syllable of words like
"lining" and "something" with a lax i (like in "pill"), while I always
pronounced it with a tense i, like in "ring". Is there some dialectal
variation I don't know about here? or am I crazy?

Of course this is Pittsburgh where the lax i has many conquests, where
"Steeler" is pronounced like "still" rather than "kneel". But they weren't
all Pittsburghers.

I would welcome any insights.

Carol Tenny
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue