LINGUIST List 13.2591

Wed Oct 9 2002

Qs: Lang Attrition, Comparing Turkish & Hungarian

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Directory

  1. Arnoud Thuss, Acceptability of prepositions on, in and auf, in
  2. Les Zsoldos, relation of Turkish to Hungarian

Message 1: Acceptability of prepositions on, in and auf, in

Date: Tue, 08 Oct 2002 10:24:08 +0000
From: Arnoud Thuss <a_thussbigfoot.com>
Subject: Acceptability of prepositions on, in and auf, in

For my Phd thesis on language attrition I am looking for example
phrases in which the acceptability of the preposition is
questionable. For example, ''Ajax scored 17 points on a year'', which
some English speakers would accept (''on'' being used in a rather
statistical sense) and others would reject (''in'' being a more
obvious choice). One of my theses is that emigrants, who live in an L2
environment, tend to find questionable sentences with ''in'' and
''on'' less acceptable than the control group in an L1 environment. I
also want to investigate this with German ''auf'' and ''in''. Does
anybody know where I can find example sentences?

Subject-Language: English;German, Standard; Code: GER 
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Message 2: relation of Turkish to Hungarian

Date: Tue, 08 Oct 2002 20:46:56 +0000
From: Les Zsoldos <lgzsfu.ca>
Subject: relation of Turkish to Hungarian

I'm curious about the Turkish language and its similarity to
Hungarian. Can anyone tell me what type of stress there is in Turkish?
Is it fixed on the first syllable of a word or does it vary? Also,
does it have a word for 'have' or use a constrution such as dative +
be verb to express possession? Does it pluralize after number? Does
it conjugate verbs in all persons, does it have a definite/indefinite
conjugation like in Hungarian, does it have a large number of cases,
does it have an accusative marker, and does it have long vowels and
consonants?

Thank you,

Les Zsoldos 
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