LINGUIST List 13.3340

Wed Dec 18 2002

Qs: CD Recorder, Human Subjects, Teen Lingo

Editor for this issue: Renee Galvis <reneelinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Uwe Seibert, Portable CD recorder
  2. David J Silva, Request for Information about Human Subjects
  3. Michael Luxenberg, Preteen and Teenage lingo

Message 1: Portable CD recorder

Date: Mon, 16 Dec 2002 11:59:09 +0000
From: Uwe Seibert <Uwe.Seibertcolorado.edu>
Subject: Portable CD recorder

This year, Marantz has launched a portable CD recorder (Marantz
CDR300) which lets you record interviews directly to CD-R discs that
will play back in any CD player, and also has the possibility to run
from a 12v battery source. Has anyone used this new technology and can
you recommend it?
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Message 2: Request for Information about Human Subjects

Date: Tue, 17 Dec 2002 16:50:23 -0500
From: David J Silva <davidling.uta.edu>
Subject: Request for Information about Human Subjects

Dear all,

At our university, there has been a recent crackdown on matters
concerning the use of human subjects in research. This crackdown has
raised serious questions about the extent to which linguistic research
(of the medically non-invasive sort) qualifies for 'exempt' status
according to federal guidelines. From what I can gather, for example,
the simple act of tape recording a data-elicitation session
disqualifies one from an exemption.

I'd like to know if this matter has been raised at other
universities. If so, how was it handled? While I am amenable to
hearing "horror stories," I'd also like to get some constructive
suggestions as to how I might interact with our compliance officer to
address linguistics-specific concerns.

Please address any contributions to the discussion to me directly; if
there is sufficient response, I will post a summary to the list.

Non-compliantly yours,

-David Silva
*********************************************************************
David James SILVA, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Linguistics vox: 817-272-3133
Director, Program in Linguistics fax: 817-272-2731
The University of Texas at Arlington net: http://ling.uta.edu/~david
Hammond Hall 403 -- UTA Box 19559
Arlington, TX 76019-0559 USA
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Message 3: Preteen and Teenage lingo

Date: Wed, 18 Dec 2002 11:14:38 -0500
From: Michael Luxenberg <MichaelLmoret.com>
Subject: Preteen and Teenage lingo

I am researching preteen and teenage slang. Can you direct me to where
I can find the most common slang words used by these groups.

Thank you.

Mike Moret
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