LINGUIST List 13.49

Thu Jan 10 2002

Qs: Floating Tones, Head Prominence

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate. In addition to posting a summary, we'd like to remind people that it is usually a good idea to personally thank those individuals who have taken the trouble to respond to the query.

Directory

  1. Mike Cahill, floating tones
  2. Mike Cahill, head prominence

Message 1: floating tones

Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 08:19:36 -0500
From: Mike Cahill <mike_cahillsil.org>
Subject: floating tones



"Floating tones" are abundant in African languages, and have been
documented in a number of Mexican languages as well. Does anyone know
of their existence in other languages of the world? I'll post a
summary of responses.

Dr. Mike Cahill
Summer Institute of Linguistics
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: head prominence

Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 08:22:50 -0500
From: Mike Cahill <mike_cahillsil.org>
Subject: head prominence



It seems intuitively obvious that heads of phrases should be more
phonetically prominent than non-heads. But does anyone know of cases
or actual studies where this has been shown? Or counterexamples? I'll
post a summary of responses.

Dr. Mike Cahill
Summer Institute of Linguistics
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue