LINGUIST List 13.718

Sat Mar 16 2002

Qs: Derivational Suffixes, NP Constructions/Arabic

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate. In addition to posting a summary, we'd like to remind people that it is usually a good idea to personally thank those individuals who have taken the trouble to respond to the query.

Directory

  1. Hudson, Richard, Derivational Suffixes List
  2. Joost Kremers, NP constructions in Arabic

Message 1: Derivational Suffixes List

Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2002 15:25:22 +0100
From: Hudson, Richard <RHudsonDEFiNiENS.com>
Subject: Derivational Suffixes List

Hi there,

I am trying to locate a reliable and reasonably exhaustive list
of English derivational suffixes together with information for each
suffix about the permitted wordclass(es) of the derivand and
derivative.

I would be extremely grateful for any tips.

Thanks,

Richard Hudson

_____________________________________

Richard Hudson
Computer Linguist / Software Developer

Definiens AG
Trappentreustr. 1; 80339 Munich Germany
Fax: +49-(0)89-231180-90 
rhudsondefiniens.com
http://www.definiens.com/
_____________________________________

Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: NP constructions in Arabic

Date: Fri, 15 Mar 2002 20:12:30 +0100
From: Joost Kremers <joostkremersyahoo.com>
Subject: NP constructions in Arabic


Hello list,

I am currently working on noun-phrase constructions in Arabic, and i
have started looking at structures such as the following, where an
adjective is modified by a genitive noun:

(1) (rajulun) Tawiilu -l-qaamati
 (man.Nom) tall.Nom the-stature.Gen
 `(a man,) tall of stature'

This particular example is perhaps rather awkward in English, but
similar constructions do exist: e.g. "free of charge".

I have been trying to find studies, papers etc. that deal with these
kinds of structures from a syntactic or semantic point of view, but I
haven't been able to find much. If anyone of you should know of such
studies, I would appreciate if you would let me know. I can be
reached via e-mail at j.kremerslet.kun.nl or joostkremersyahoo.com.

Thanks in advance,

Joost Kremers

- 
Joost Kremers

University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands
Department of Arabic and Islam

PO Box 9103
6500HD Nijmegen, The Netherlands
+31 24 3612996
j.kremerslet.kun.nl
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue