LINGUIST List 14.1419

Sun May 18 2003

Calls: Syntax/Russia; Geolinguistics/NY USA

Editor for this issue: Marie Klopfenstein <marielinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Solovyev, LENCA-2
  2. Wayne Finke, LANGUAGE IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION

Message 1: LENCA-2

Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 10:38:22 +0400
From: Solovyev <solovyevmi.ru>
Subject: LENCA-2

INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM
ON THE TYPOLOGY OF ARGUMENT STRUCTURE 
AND GRAMMATICAL RELATIONS IN LANGUAGES SPOKEN IN EUROPE AND NORTH AND
CENTRAL ASIA (LENCA-2)
at Kazan State University, Tatarstan Republic, Russia 
May 11-14, 2004

The second international symposium on the languages spoken in Europe
and North and Central Asia (LENCA) will take place at Kazan State
University, Tatarstan, Russia, on May 11-14, 2004. Kazan is the
capital of the Tatarstan Republic in Russia. The topic of the
symposium is argument structure and grammatical relations in the
languages spoken in this area. The first symposium on the languages
belonging to the LENCA-group was at the Udmurt State University,
Izhevsk, Udmurtia, Russia, 2001.

The languages spoken in Europe and North and Central Asia belong to
several major language families. The Indo-European, Uralic and Turkic
languages are the largest language families in Europe and North and
Central Asia. In addition, Tungusic and Palaeo-Siberian languages
belong to the indigenous languages of the area. In Central Asia, the
area overlaps with the area of the Mongolic languages, and in the
Southeast, the Sinitic languages. In the South, the area also borders
on the languages spoken in the Caucasus, and the western part of the
main area of the Semitic languages is located on the border of the
languages spoken in Southern Europe. During the course of history,
this area has been a meeting place of numerous cultural and linguistic
strands. In most cases, this large area is multi-cultural and
multilingual, and many people living in the area know, in addition to
their native language, some other languages spoken in the area. Among
these languages, the Indo-European languages are best known, but most
of the languages spoken in the eastern part of this large area are
poorly known even among linguists. New research would also provide
material for research on the contacts among these languages, and on
the study of the universals of language. For that reason, papers on
the languages bordering on the area are also welcome in the
symposium. When collecting new information about these languages, it
is also possible to gather new information for cross-linguistic
studies.

The symposium will last for four days, and if needed, parallel
sections can be arranged. Particularly thinking of work in progress,
also a separate poster section will be arranged. The abstracts to be
submitted to the Programme Committee should not exceed four pages. The
abstracts will be published for the symposium, and also an internet
version of the abstracts will be available. Authors are encouraged to
write their papers so that most of the papers to be presented in the
symposium could be published later.

Plenary Speakers 

Bernard Comrie, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology,
Leipzig
John Hawkins, University of Southern California, Los Angeles 
Lars Johanson, Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz 
Alexandr E. Kibrik, Moscow State University, Moscow 
Masayoshi Shibatani, Rice University, Houston 
Anna Siewierska, University of Lancaster, Lancaster 

Important dates 

Deadline for submitting abstracts: November 30, 2003
Notification of acceptance: January 15, 2004
Dates of the symposium: May 11-14, 2004 

The abstract can be submitted in electronic form or as a paper copy.
The electronic versions should be in plain text or in HTML or LaTeX,
and should be sent to kazaneva.mpg.de. The paper copies should be
sent to University of Helsinki, Department of General Linguistics
(International Symposium on Argument Structure) (Attn. Dr. Pirkko
Suihkonen), University of Helsinki, Department of General Linguistics,
P.O. Box 9 (Siltavuorenpenger 20), 00014 UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI,
Finland, or to Kazan State University, Department of Computer Science
(International Symposium on Argument Structure), (Attn. Prof. Valery
Solovyev), ul. Kremlevskaya 18, 420008 KAZAN, Russia. E-mail address
for the symposium: kazaneva.mpg.de

Official languages of the symposium: English, Russian, French, German,
and Tatar

Co-Chairs of the Programme Committee 

Prof. Dr. Bernard Comrie
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Deutscher Platz 6
D-04103 LEIPZIG, Germany
Phone: +49-(0)-341 99 52 301
Fax: +49-(0)-341 99 52 119

Prof. Dr. Valery Solovyev 
Kazan State University
Department of Computer science 
Chair of the Cognitive science laboratory 
Kremlevskaya Str. 18
420008 KAZAN, Russia
Phone: +7 8432 616914
Fax: +7 8432 387525 

Dr. Pirkko Suihkonen 
University of Helsinki
Department of General Linguistics
P.O. Box 9 (Siltavuorenpenger 20 A)
F-00014 UNIVERSITY OF HELSINKI, Finland
Phone: +358-(0)9-191 21723
Fax: +358-(0)9-191 29307 

Programme Committee:

Prof. Dr. Anders Ahlqvist, National University of Ireland, Galway,
Ireland
Prof. Dr. Michael Fortescue, University of Copenhagen, Institute for
General and Applied Linguistics, Copenhagen
Prof. Dr. L�szl� Honti, Universit� degli Studi di Udine, Instituto di
Glottologia e Filologia Classica, Udine
Prof. Dr. Juha Janhunen, University of Helsinki, Institute for Asian
and African Studies, Helsinki
Prof. Dr. Lars Johanson, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz,
Department of Oriental Studies / Johannes Gutenbert-Universit�t Mainz,
Seminar f�r Orientkunde, Mainz
Prof. Dr. Natalia I. Pushina, Udmurt State University, Institute of
Foreign Languages an Literature, Department of English Grammar and
History, Izhevsk
Prof. Dr. Pekka Sammallahti, University of Oulu, Department of
Finnish, Saami and Logopedics, Oulu
Prof. Dr. Hans-J�rgen Sasse, Universit�t zu K�ln, Institut f�r
Sprachwissenschaft, Cologne
Prof. Dr. Alan Timberlake, University of California at Berkeley,
Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures, Berkeley
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Message 2: LANGUAGE IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION

Date: Fri, 16 May 2003 10:42:10 -0400
From: Wayne Finke <wayne_finkebaruch.cuny.edu>
Subject: LANGUAGE IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION


THE AMERICAN SOCIETY OF GEOLINGUISTICS

Announcing the International Conference on

LANGUAGE IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION


 Globalization is like the weather that Mark Twain described:
Everybody talks about it but nobody does anything about it.
Globalization is feared by some but appears to be inevitable and when
it is discussed that is almost exclusively in terms of transnational
corporations and world markets. But there is at least one other
important aspect.

 The American Society of Geolinguistics (ASG) will address
LANGUAGE IN THE ERA OF GLOBALIZATION at an international conference to
be held October 2-4, 2003 at Baruch College (CUNY). It will deal with
a broad spectrum of geolinguistic topics ranging from global
challenges to bilingualism, translation, creoles and linguas francas,
to World English in commerce and tourism, the death or deformation of
minority languages, and the backlash that endangered languages may
produce at the brink.

 Send today a proposal (of not more than 250 words) for a
20-minute paper to be read at the conference. Proposals must reach
the secretary by 15 July 2003, but earlier submissions are invited,
particularly if you wish to speak on a certain day or time. Those
coming to the conference from overseas are advised that visas to visit
the United States take now much longer to obtain than was the case in
the past. ASG usually holds these international conferences every
second year, but the huge success of the LANGUAGE AND IDENTITY
(October 2-5, 2002) conference, with a program of 60 papers and
participants from more than two dozen countries, has prompted ASG to
have this 2003 conference. As with all ASG conferences, papers are
refereed and proceedings are published. In 2003 conferees will be
offered reduced hotel rates and will be able to enjoy New York City at
the height of its cultural and entertainment seasons. Contact the
secretary of the conference: Professor Wayne H. Finke, Modern
Languages, B6-280, Baruch College, 1 Bernard Baruch College, New York,
NY 10010-5585. E-mail: wayne_finkebaruch.cuny.edu
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