LINGUIST List 14.1906

Thu Jul 10 2003

Qs: Written/Spoken Eng; Remnant Movement

Editor for this issue: Naomi Fox <foxlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Nicole Dehe, written vs. spoken language
  2. Peter Svenonius, Remnant movement

Message 1: written vs. spoken language

Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 12:10:26 +0000
From: Nicole Dehe <ndehetu-bs.de>
Subject: written vs. spoken language

Does anybody know any (empirical or theoretical) studies on the
difference between spoken and written language in English or related
languages? I am particularly interested in constructions allowing for
word/constituent order alternation and whether they behave
differently, but I will be grateful for any suggestions.

Many thanks,
Nicole Dehe 
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Message 2: Remnant movement

Date: Wed, 09 Jul 2003 13:49:23 +0000
From: Peter Svenonius <peter.svenoniushum.uit.no>
Subject: Remnant movement

I am researching remnant movement for a survey article and would
appreciate being informed of relevant work on the topic.

I will be compiling a bibliography and would be grateful to receive or
be pointed to articles or other works, preferably with full
bibliographic references. I can use EndNote in case anyone wonders.

Please send information to me at peter.svenoniushum.uit.no

I will post a summary. 
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