LINGUIST List 14.2228

Fri Aug 22 2003

Qs: Mongolian parsers; Change in German Lang Rhythm

Editor for this issue: Takoko Matsui <takolinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. John Kovarik, Mongolian parsers and NLP grammars
  2. Joseph Daniele, Change in German Language Rhythm

Message 1: Mongolian parsers and NLP grammars

Date: Thu, 21 Aug 2003 16:04:57 +0000
From: John Kovarik <kovariksworldnet.att.net>
Subject: Mongolian parsers and NLP grammars

I have seen references on the Internet to a DCG parser by Purev Jaimai
and some new grammars for the parsing of Mongolian coming out of the
EALPIIT03 NLP conference in UlaanBaatar this July. I would like to
read more. Can anyone tell me how I may purchase a copy of the
EALPIIT03 proceedings? or how I might contact the authors? I am
considering building a morpho-syntactic analyzer for Mongolian, but I
do not want to ''re-invent the wheel'' if someone has already created
one.

Language-Family: Altaic; Code: AT
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Message 2: Change in German Language Rhythm

Date: Fri, 22 Aug 2003 13:44:58 +0000
From: Joseph Daniele <jdanielemit.edu>
Subject: Change in German Language Rhythm

Is there any evidence to suggest that the German language has changed
in rhythmic structure over time eg. over the past three hundred years,
so that it was previously more ''syllable-timed'' as opposed to its
current status as a ''stress-timed'' language?
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