LINGUIST List 14.2462

Wed Sep 17 2003

Calls: Semantics/Germany; Applied Ling/UK

Editor for this issue: Steve Moran <stevelinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. zybatov, Workshop on Event Structures in Linguistic Form and Interpretation
  2. k.segall, British Association of Applied Linguistics

Message 1: Workshop on Event Structures in Linguistic Form and Interpretation

Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2003 05:24:55 +0000
From: zybatov <zybatovrz.uni-leipzig.de>
Subject: Workshop on Event Structures in Linguistic Form and Interpretation

Workshop on Event Structures in Linguistic Form and Interpretation 
Short Title: event structures 04

Date: 17-MAR-04 - 19-MAR-04
Location: Leipzig, Saxony, Germany
Contact: Tatjana Zybatow
Contact Email: zybatovrz.uni-leipzig.de 
Meeting URL: http://www.uni-leipzig.de/~event04


Linguistic Sub-field: Semantics 
Call Deadline: 15-Nov-2003

Meeting Description:

The main purpose of the conference is to bring together insights on
how eventuality structures are reflected in linguistic form and how
such structures can be derived from it in utterance
interpretation. Papers describing research contributions on any aspect
of event-based semantics or verbal semantics are welcome for
discussion.

 SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS
 Workshop on
 Event Structures in Linguistic Form and Interpretation

Location: Leipzig, Germany
Date: March 17-19, 2004 
Abstract Deadline: November 15, 2003

The workshop is hosted by the research project 'Event Structures:
Grammatical and Conceptual Components of Utterance Interpretation' at
the Department of Linguistics of the University of Leipzig and the
Graduiertenkolleg 'Universality and Diversity: Linguistic Structures
and Processes', University of Leipzig. Papers describing research
contributions on any aspect of event-based semantics or verbal
semantics are welcome for discussion. Conference languages will be
English and German. Continuously updated information on the workshop
(including registration, accommodation, program, location etc.) can be
found at the website:

http://www.uni-leipzig.de/~event04/.

Outstanding papers read at the conference will be published in
cooperation with Mouton de Gruyter.

Invited Speakers:

Thomas Ernst (University of Massachussetts, Amherst, USA)
Angelika Kratzer (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA)
Susan Rothstein (Bar-Ilan University Ramat-Gan, Israel)

Program Committee:

Markus Egg (University of Saarbr�cken, Germany)
Veronika Ehrich (University of T�bingen, Germany)
Stefan Engelberg (University of Wuppertal, Germany)
Hana Filip (University of Stanford, USA)
Fritz Hamm (University of T�bingen, Germany)
Angelika Kratzer (University of Massachusetts, USA)
Manfred Krifka (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany)
Claudia Maienborn (Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany)
Susan Rothstein (Bar-Ilan University Ramat-Gan, Israel)
Henri�tte de Swart (University of Utrecht, The Netherlands)
Arnim von Stechow (University of T�bingen, Germany)

Organizers: Kristin B�rjesson, Johannes D�lling, Tatjana
Heyde-Zybatow, Martin Sch�fer, Barbara Sonnenhauser,

Contact: Tatjana Heyde-Zybatow
E-Mail: zybatovrz.uni-leipzig.de

Workshop Description:

The main purpose of the conference is to bring together insights on
how eventuality structures are reflected in linguistic form and how
such structures can be derived from it in utterance interpretation.

Special topics of interest are:
- Lexical structure of verbs
- Aspectual composition
- Adverbial modification

Questions we would like to see adressed include, but are not limited
to the following:

Lexical structure of verbs

- What format should be used for the semantic representation of verbs
' Davidsonian, neo-Davidsonian or other formats?

- Can verb meanings be characterized by lexical decomposition and, if
so, which primitives should be used then?

- How much of the eventuality structure should explicitly appear in
lexical structure? What role does semantic underspecification play?
What kind of mechanisms can be supposed for pragmatic specification of
the eventuality structure addressed by verbs?

- How does the mapping into syntax work? How can the lexical
information of the verbs influence the syntactic derivation of the
respective sentence?

- What kind of connection should be assumed between eventuality structure and thematic structure? Do different thematic structures necessarily lead to different verbal entries?

Aspectual composition

- What are the similarities and differences between the several
semantic frameworks respresenting incremental relations in eventuality
structure? Should a mereological approach to aspectual composition be
preferred?

- Are the aspectual type of the respective verb and the semantic
properties of its arguments enough for the computation of the
eventuality type encoded by the verb-argument complex? Should
mechanisms like aspectual shifting be assumed in addition?

- How much of the aspectual composition can be relegated to
pragmatics? What would then explain the systematic dependencies
between grammatical aspect and aktionsarten?

- In what way can the mereological approach be extended to cover also
expressions involving a path or a scalar change or intransitive verbs?

Adverbial modification

- What are the licensing syntactic and semantic conditions on
adverbial modification?

- Should non-sentential modifiers, such as manner adverbs, be
represented as operators on verb meanings or as predicates of events?
Are there any differences between the several classes of modifiers in
this respect?

- How does variation of linear word order involving adverbs bear on
the interpretation of the respective utterances? What triggers the
variations? What precisely are the particular effects on the resulting
eventuality structure?

- To what extent does adverbial modification involve a
reinterpretation that is triggered by aspectual mismatches and is
executed by coercion of eventuality type?

- Can the use of one adverb as sentence or verb modifier be derived
from one lexical entry? How does this relate to the cognate adjectival
usages?

Submission of Abstracts:

We invite submissions for 30-minute presentations (+ 10 minutes for
discussion). The abstract should not exceed 2 pages (including
references and examples). Please leave at least a 2,5 cm margin on all
four sides, and use at least a 12-pt font. Anyone may submit at most
one abstract as a single author and a second one as co-author. The
Authors' names, affiliations and contact address should be included in
the e-mail text. The abstracts themselves must be anonymous.

DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSION: November 15, 2003

Please submit abstracts electronically (pdf, ps, ms word, rtf) to:
zybatovrz.uni-leipzig.de
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Message 2: British Association of Applied Linguistics

Date: Wed, 17 Sep 2003 05:54:13 +0000
From: k.segall <k.segallroehampton.ac.uk>
Subject: British Association of Applied Linguistics

British Association of Applied Linguistics/Cambridge University Press
Seminars 2004

Date: 01-Jan-2004 - 31-Dec-2004
Location: UK, United Kingdom
Contact: Kate Segall
Contact Email: k.segallroehampton.ac.uk 
Meeting URL: http://www.baal.org.uk/events.htm


Linguistic Sub-field: Applied Linguistics 
Call Deadline: 15-Oct-2003

Meeting Description:

As part of its commitment to research in Applied Linguistics, BAAL is
pleased to announce that financial support from Cambridge University
Press and BAAL will be available for three seminars in 2004. BAAL now
invites proposals for the 2004 seminars, in all areas of applied
linguistics, to be submitted to Kate Segall (Seminar Organiser) by 15
October 2003. B.A.A.L./Cambridge University Press

SEMINAR PROGRAMME 2004

Call for seminar proposals

As part of its commitment to research in Applied Linguistics, BAAL is
pleased to announce that financial support from Cambridge University
Press and BAAL will be available for three seminars in 2004. BAAL now
invites proposals for the 2004 seminars, in all areas of applied
linguistics, to be submitted to Kate Segall (Seminar Organiser) by 15
October 2003 (address below).

These notes are intended as guidelines for the submission of proposals
by seminar co-ordinators. They outline the sort of meeting that BAAL
is particularly keen to encourage and the support that BAAL can offer.

Structure 

BAAL is interested in promoting in-depth discussion of research topics
in a format which is different from the opportunities provided at the
Annual Meeting and in other seminar programmes. We are particularly
interested in supporting research meetings which are
interdisciplinary, and provide opportunities for BAAL members,
particularly BAAL members who are relatively new to Applied
Linguistics, to meet people working in other disciplines. Applications
from organisers who plan to follow an original, novel format are
welcomed.

For these reasons, members preparing proposals for BAAL / Cambridge
University Press seminars should bear the following in mind:

1) Proposals should investigate emergent, timely or relevant methods
or topics. 

2) Seminar meetings should be small enough that all the participants
can interact with each other. We recommend meetings of ideally 15 - 25
people.

3) At least two of these places should normally be reserved for
student members of BAAL.

4) Seminar meetings should include an opportunity for people to meet
informally. For this reason, two- or even three-day meetings are
probably preferable to one-day, non-residential meetings.

5) Meetings which are jointly organised with another learned society
are encouraged.

6) Seminar organisers might want to restrict invitations to
participate in the seminar to invitees with special expertise. However
if this is the case, then care should be taken that the seminar does
not become accessible only to those with detailed specialist
knowledge. Organisers should specify whether they plan attendance to
be by invitation only. Normally, at least one BAAL committee member
should attend a seminar.

7) The time allocated to papers / presentations should be long enough
for useful discussion to take place afterwards. This probably means
not all participants will be able to present papers, and organisers
will need to select.

8) The seminar may have clear academic outcomes (e.g.) formation of a
group, publication of a monograph, please specify if you think this
will be the case.


Financial support 
Financial support for 3 seminars which are successful in the
competition takes the following forms:

a) a repayable float of �500 
b) a non-repayable grant of �450 

In addition, 2 runners up in the competition for the main funding may
be awarded BAAL support:

a repayable float of �500 (These additional awards will be made at
the discretion of the BAAL Executive Committee)

These grants are intended to be used towards the costs of bookings,
insurance, invited speakers, support for post-graduate students and so
on. The grants will automatically be made on request to the BAAL
Treasurer by any seminar co-ordinator whose proposal is adopted for
the BAAL / Cambridge University Press seminar programme. BAAL is keen
that all money awarded should be spent on the seminars themselves, and
therefore would prefer to support events held in institutions where
'top-slicing' of the grant can be avoided.


Organisation 

Once accepted for BAAL / Cambridge University Press sponsorship,
seminar co-ordinators will receive guidelines on the organisation of
seminars. At this point, the following should be noted:

BAAL will advertise any seminars adopted for the program in its own
national publicity. Any local publicity should state that the seminar
is supported by BAAL and Cambridge University Press. BAAL does not
expect to make a financial profit out of the seminars, and will not
cover any loss made by a seminar. Proper accounts explaining how BAAL
grants have been spent will need to be provided. A report on the
seminar will be required for publication in the BAAL newsletter within
4 weeks of the seminar having taken place.

Seminar Proposals 

The seminar programme is the subject of an open competition. BAAL
members are invited to submit proposals for seminars for the 2004
programme by 15 October 2003. All bids will be scrutinised by the
Executive Committee at its December meeting. The results will be
announced in January 2004.

Please submit proposals in hard copy and by email. They should not
exceed 2000 words in total should include the following information:

- Seminar Title 
- Date 
- Place 
- Name / Institution of Seminar Co-ordinator(s) (only proposals
submitted by BAAL members can be considered)
- Full contact details (email and postal addresses and telephone
number)
- Objectives of the seminar 
- Rationale 
- Organisation 
- Numbers - organisers are encouraged to be realistic about likely
numbers and particularly to avoid over-estimating likely interest
- Participants e.g. by invitation or application, keynote speakers etc
- Length of event / sessions number of papers, discussion groups,
workshops
- Projected costs to participants (if any) 
- Co-operation with other learned societies or interest groups
- Proposed use of sponsorship money, including projected costs where
possible


Proposals or enquiries to: 

Kate Segall
k.segallroehampton.ac.uk or kate.segallbtopenworld.com
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