LINGUIST List 14.2589

Sun Sep 28 2003

Qs: 'Surfer' Phonetics; 'Spam' Documentation

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Directory

  1. Richard Wright, Surfer phonetics?
  2. anja wanner, Origin of "SPAM" -- what came after Monty Python?

Message 1: Surfer phonetics?

Date: Fri, 26 Sep 2003 18:59:22 +0000
From: Richard Wright <rawrightu.washington.edu>
Subject: Surfer phonetics?

Do any of you know of any papers that report on the phonetic
characteristics of ''surfer speak''? We're particularly interested in
the laryngeal characteristics. 

Thank you!
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Message 2: Origin of "SPAM" -- what came after Monty Python?

Date: Thu, 25 Sep 2003 00:50:51 +0000
From: anja wanner <awannerwisc.edu>
Subject: Origin of "SPAM" -- what came after Monty Python?

Dear linguists,

according to David Crystal's ''Language and the Internet'' (2001, CUP)
and many other sources, the origin of the word ''spam'' as we use it
today (sending large quantities of unwanted e-mail messages) lies in a
1970 Monty Python sketch in which a waitress floods two customers with
recitals of a menu with numerous spam variations (''spam bacon sausage
and spam...''). I am looking for documentation of any intermediate
steps in the extended use of ''spam'' after 1970 -- is there anything
that does not involve electronic media?

Thanks for your help! 

Anja Wanner
University of Wisconsin-Madison, English Department
http://mendota.english.wisc.edu/~awanner/ 
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