LINGUIST List 14.2907

Thu Oct 23 2003

Qs: Word Association;Arabic Regressive Assimilation

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Directory

  1. Amy Reff, concreteness and imageability
  2. Arum Astuti, regressive assimilation of nasal to voiced glides

Message 1: concreteness and imageability

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2003 17:02:28 +0000
From: Amy Reff <areffessex.ac.uk>
Subject: concreteness and imageability

I'm currently doing research in word associations and would like to
look at concreteness and imageability effects. My supervisor recalls
that there were indices at my university library on these very terms,
however he cannot recall how he came across them. Does anyone know of
the existence of such things? Thanks a lot for any suggestions or
offers of aid!
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Message 2: regressive assimilation of nasal to voiced glides

Date: Thu, 23 Oct 2003 04:16:15 +0000
From: Arum Astuti <zidny_ilmantelkom.net>
Subject: regressive assimilation of nasal to voiced glides

In Arabic, there is a case when /n/ at the end of a word becomes
glides when it is followed by glides at the beginning of the following
word. For example /man jaqu:lu/ --> /maj jaqu:lu/. In this case, the
geminates /jj/ is nasalized. One says that the nasalization is
unnatural because the nasalization should be lost if the /n/ becoming
/j/. My question is, why /j/ has no tendency in retaining nasalization
when it comes into contact with nasals ? As to compare, vowels has
tendency to be nasalized when it occurs before or after nasal
consonants.
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