LINGUIST List 14.3498

Thu Dec 18 2003

Qs: Internet Pragmatics; English 'Yet'

Editor for this issue: Naomi Fox <foxlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Maj-Britt Mosegaard Hansen, Pragmatics of internet sites: references?
  2. Raphael Salkie, The discourse marker YET in English

Message 1: Pragmatics of internet sites: references?

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 05:00:49 -0500 (EST)
From: Maj-Britt Mosegaard Hansen <majhum.ku.dk>
Subject: Pragmatics of internet sites: references?

Dear colleagues,

A student of mine would like to write a Master's thesis on the
pragmatics of internet sites. Consequently, we're looking for recent,
linguistically-oriented references that might enlighten her (and me)
and help her decide on a more specific subtopic. Can anyone help?
She works on French, so we'll be especially grateful for any
references to studies done specifically on French web sites. Thanks
very much in advance!

Maj-Britt Mosegaard Hansen, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of French linguistics
U. of Copenhagen 
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Message 2: The discourse marker YET in English

Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 12:56:40 -0500 (EST)
From: Raphael Salkie <r.m.salkiebton.ac.uk>
Subject: The discourse marker YET in English

I am looking for published studies of the discourse marker YET in
English. Also, any studies on the word STILL, which, like YET, seems
to have a basic temporal meaning which underlies its use as a
discourse marker.

Subject-Language: English; Code: ENG 
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