LINGUIST List 14.501

Thu Feb 20 2003

Qs: Formant Frequencies, Random Wordlist Generator

Editor for this issue: Renee Galvis <reneelinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Tony Gillham, Formant Frequencies - Role of transfer in Native Russian's English
  2. Kevin Roddy, random wordlist generator using phonemic inventory

Message 1: Formant Frequencies - Role of transfer in Native Russian's English

Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 11:30:56 +0000
From: Tony Gillham <tony_gillhamblueyonder.co.uk>
Subject: Formant Frequencies - Role of transfer in Native Russian's English

Is there any research/data available on Formant frequencies of Russian
/jo/ and unstressed /o/? This would be useful in developing my thesis
on Russian English learners' strategies for emulating the English
mid-vowels.

Subject-Language: Russian; Code: RUS 
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Message 2: random wordlist generator using phonemic inventory

Date: Wed, 19 Feb 2003 21:40:59 +0000
From: Kevin Roddy <kroddyhawaii.edu>
Subject: random wordlist generator using phonemic inventory

I am looking for a software program that would take the phonemic
inventory of a language and generate wordlists to use with language
consultants in fieldwork.

For example, Hawaiian has an inventory of consonants h k l m n p ' w
and vowels a e i o u

Is there software that would randomly generate word lists like the
following?

ha he hi ho hu haa hae hai hao hau, etc. 

A linguist here in Hawai'i told me about such a program he worked with
years ago, and if available, I'd like to use it for a under-documented
language I'm doing fieldwork on.

Thanks for your help, world-wide linguists!

Kevin Roddy, 
Graduate Student
Department of Linguistics 
University of Hawai'i 
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