LINGUIST List 14.647

Thu Mar 6 2003

Qs: German Inflection, Backward Speech

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Directory

  1. Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy, OT analysis of inflection in the German NP
  2. Abby Brown, speaking/talking backwards

Message 1: OT analysis of inflection in the German NP

Date: Mon, 03 Mar 2003 17:33:29 +0000
From: Andrew Carstairs-McCarthy <andrew.carstairs-mccarthycanterbury.ac.nz>
Subject: OT analysis of inflection in the German NP

The distribution of 'strong' and 'weak' suffixes among determiners,
adjectives and nouns in the German noun phrase (or DP) seems to cry
out for an analysis in terms of violable ranked constraints. I have
come across only one article squarely on this topic, however: 'Remarks
on nominal inflection in German' by Gereon M´┐Żller, at the Rutgers OT
archive. Are there others that I have missed?

I would also be grateful to hear about any other recent theoretically
oriented work on the shape and distribution of the suffixes concerned
(not just on the morphosyntactic properties that these suffixes
realize).

I will post a summary. 

Subject-Language: German, Standard; Code: GER 
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Message 2: speaking/talking backwards

Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 14:35:42 +0000
From: Abby Brown <brownabbyjuno.com>
Subject: speaking/talking backwards

I have been trying to locate more recent literature/research on
backward speech, fluent backward speaking, and language games in which
children speak backwards-- from a phonological perspective. I am aware
of some older research (mainly 1980s) by Cowan,Braine, and Leavitt,
but does anyone know of more recent studies, that is 1990s and later?
I've tried LLBA and Erik searches, but no luck. Maybe I'm using the
wrong key words. Can anyone help?
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