LINGUIST List 14.773

Mon Mar 17 2003

Calls: Compositionality/Update: Generative Ling

Editor for this issue: Marie Klopfenstein <marielinguistlist.org>


FUND DRIVE 2003 Thanks to the generosity of our subscribers we were able to reach the $10,000 mark in record time. Because of this we were able to secure a $1,500 donation from John Benjamins Publishing - a big thank you to all the crew at JBs! But we still have a long way to go! Please help us reach our total of $50,000 by making a donation at: http://linguistlist.org/donation.html The LINGUIST List depends on the generous contributions from subscribers like you; we would not be able to operate without your help. The moderators, staff, and student editors at LINGUIST would like to take this opportunity to thank you for your continuous support. As a matter of policy, LINGUIST discourages the use of abbreviations or acronyms in conference announcements unless they are explained in the text. To post to LINGUIST, use our convenient web form at http://linguistlist.org/LL/posttolinguist.html.

Directory

  1. pauline_jacobson, Direct Compositionality: A Worskhop
  2. Soo-Yeon Kim, Update: Generative Ling in Asia 2003

Message 1: Direct Compositionality: A Worskhop

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 12:03:42 +0000
From: pauline_jacobson <pauline_jacobsonbrown.edu>
Subject: Direct Compositionality: A Worskhop


Direct Compositionality: A Worskhop 
Short Title: Direct Compositionality

Date: 19-JUN-03 - 21-JUN-03
Location: Providence, RI, United States of America
Contact: Pauline Jacobson
Contact Email: pauline_jacobsonbrown.edu 
Meeting URL: to be announced

Linguistic Sub-field: Syntax, Semantics 
Call Deadline: 01-Apr-2003

Meeting Description:

2nd Call for Abstracts:

There will be an NSF-funded workshop held at Brown University on June
19-21 on the topic of Direct Compositionality. The text of this
announcement is followed by a brief description of the focus of the
workshop. The conference will consist of talks by invited speakers
listed below plus up to three additional slots to be decided by
anonymously reviewed abstract. Participants whose abstracts are
chosen will be reimbursed for at least a portion of their travel
expenses and will be fully funded for housing during the conference.
In addition, all participants (both invited and those chosen by
abstract) will be requested to not only present a paper but to be a
discussant on one additional paper. Papers will typically be 35-40
minutes in length, and at least an outline of the paper will be
circulated to the other speakers a few weeks before the conference.
Those interested in submitting an abstract should submit an anonymous
abstract of NO MORE THAN 2 PAGES (please, in a readable font with
reasonable margins). Abstract deadline: April 1; we will aim for
notification within 3 weeks after that. Electronic submission (word or
.pdf files) is strongly encouraged; electronic files should be sent
to: pauline_jacobsonbrown.edu
with the header: Workshop Abstract Submission

Include your contact information (and abstract title) in the body of
the e-mail. If electronic submission is impossible, send 5 copies to:
 Pauline Jacobson
 Attn: Workshop
 Dept.of Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences
 Box 1978
 Brown University,
 Providence, RI 02912
 USA

Further Information avaible at the conference website:
	http://cog.brown.edu:16080/directcomp/

Invited Speakers:
 Chris Barker, UC San Diego
 Rajesh Bhatt, University of Texas Austin
 Maria Bittner, Rutgers University
 Daniel Buring, UCLA
 Ivano Caponigro, UCLA
 David Dowty, Ohio State University
 Danny Fox, MIT
 Daphna Heller, Rutgers
 Pauline Jacobson, Brown (organizer)
 Christopher Potts, UC Santa Cruz
 Maribel Romero , U Pennsylvania
 Ken Shan, Havard
 Yael Sharvit, University of Connecticut
 Yoad Winter, Technion Institute, Haifa
 
Workshop Description

This will be a 3-day workshop to be held at Brown University, June
19-21, 2003 on the feasibility of a particular view of the interaction
of natural language syntax and semantics. This view the hypothesis of
Direct Compositionality - according to which the syntax and semantics
work in tandem . Thus the syntactic system of natural language can be
seen as a system of rules which ''build'' (i.e., prove the
well-formedness of) linguistic expressions while the semantics works
along with this to assign meanings to these expressions. This view
was put forth in, among others, Montague (1973) and was highly
influential in much research in formal semantics during especially the
1970s and 1980s.

But this approach has been abandoned in a good deal of more modern
research, and the debate on whether or not direct compositionality is
possible has to some extent receded into the background. It is quite
common in much current work to assume a view of the syntax/semantics
interaction according to which the syntax works first to ''build''
syntactic representations which are then ''sent'' to the semantics for
interpretation. Furthermore, it is often assumed that what inputs the
actual semantic (model-theoretic) interpretation is not in fact the
surface representation of a sentence, but that this is mapped instead
to a more abstract level of Logical Form. Yet the direct
compositional view is arguably a much simpler conception of the
overall organization of the grammar, and the rationale underlying the
proposed workshop is the belief that its abandonment in much current
research is premature. The workshop is designed to reopen debate on
the feasibility of direct compositionality, bringing together
researchers who have studied this question and have approached it with
a variety of theoretical and technical tools.

In addition to the invited speakers, slots are reserved for a few
papers to be chosen by refereed abstracts. Abstract submissions are
encouraged from both sides of the debate. The ideal paper will focus
on one or more empirical phenomena and will discuss the implications
of this/these phenomena for the hypothesis of direct
compositionality. For example, a paper might be on a phenomena which
has typically been taken to provide a challenge to direct
compositionality and show that the relevant phenomena can indeed be
given a direct compositional analysis. On the other hand, equally
important are papers which argue that certain phenomena cannot indeed
be handled under direct compositionality. The goal of the workshop is
to stimulate serious discussion on this issue, and so each presenter
will also be a discussant on one other paper.
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue

Message 2: Update: Generative Ling in Asia 2003

Date: Mon, 17 Mar 2003 13:46:52 -0500 (EST)
From: Soo-Yeon Kim <kimsysejong.ac.kr>
Subject: Update: Generative Ling in Asia 2003

** Editor's Note: Please note the change in dates for the 
conference. **


4th Generative Linguistics in the Old World in Asia 2003

Short Title: Glow in Asia
Date: 20-AUG-03 - 23-AUG-03
Location: Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Contact: Keun-Won Sohn
Contact Email: kimsysejong.ac.kr
Linguistic Sub-field: General Linguistics

Call Deadline: 31-Mar-2003

Meeting Description:

THE 4th GLOW IN ASIA 2003, an international conference on theoretical
linguistics, will be held at Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea,
on August 20-22, 2003. Two additional workshops focusing on scrambling
and wh-movement will be held on August 23, 2003.

SECOND CALL FOR PAPERS

THE 4th GLOW IN ASIA 2003

Local Organizers
The Korean Generative Grammar Circle
The Institute for Linguistic Research, Seoul National University

Abstract Deadline: March 31, 2003 (Extended!)

Abstracts for the main session are invited from all areas of
theoretical linguistics. The main session will consist of
approximately 20 talks. Each speaker will be allotted 45 minutes with
15 minutes for discussion. Abstracts for the two workshops on
scrambling and wh-movement are also invited. Each presentation for the
workshops will be allotted 20 minutes with 10 minutes for
discussion. Please specify whether your abstract is for the main
session or for one of the workshops. An author may submit at most one
individual and one joint abstract.


Invited Speakers:
Main Session:	Anders Holmberg (University of Durham)
Workshops:	Mamoru Saito (Nanzan University), Norvin Richards (MIT)

Abstract Submission (both for the main session and for the workshops)

1. Abstracts can be submitted either by e-mail or by regular mail.
2. Abstracts that arrive after March 31, 2003 will not be accepted.
3. If you e-mail your abstract,
- please submit it as an attachment in PDF, MS WORD, or HWP formats,
addressed to: kwsohnmail.hannam.ac.kr
- in the subject line of your mail, write ''Glow Abstract''.
- in the text of your mail, please write the following: whether it is
for the main session or for the workshops, the title of the paper, the
author's name, affiliation, mailing address, e-mail address, telephone
number, status (student or non-student)
4. If you send your abstract by regular mail, please send
- 10 copies of an anonymous two-page abstract, 1-inch margins on all
four sides,12pt font,
- a camera-ready original of the abstract with the author's name and
affiliation, and
- a separate sheet indicating whether it is for the main session or
for the workshop, the title of the paper, the author's name,
affiliation, mailing address, e-mail address, telephone number, and
status (student or non-student)
- to:
 THE 4th GLOW IN ASIA Selection Committee
 c/o Prof. Keun-Won Sohn
 Hannam University
 Dept. of English Education
 133 Ojung-dong Daeduk-gu
 Daejeon, Korea (zip code: 306-791)
Mail to author|Respond to list|Read more issues|LINGUIST home page|Top of issue