LINGUIST List 15.1080

Thu Apr 1 2004

Qs: L1 Utterance Source; English Auxiliary Omission

Editor for this issue: Naomi Fox <foxlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Martha McGinnis, "I was me" for "it was me"?
  2. Sebastian Rasinger, London English auxiliary omission

Message 1: "I was me" for "it was me"?

Date: Wed, 31 Mar 2004 18:59:43 -0500 (EST)
From: Martha McGinnis <mcginnisucalgary.ca>
Subject: "I was me" for "it was me"?

Dear linguists,

I'm trying to narrow down possible L1 sources for a second-language
utterance in English. The speaker says ''I was me,'' meaning ''It was
me.'' This might just have been a speech error, but I'm wondering if
it might have been a loan translation. Are there any languages that
use ''I was me'' for ''It was me''? -- for example, in something like
''I suppose you've been wondering who raked the yard. Well, it was
me!''

Please send any responses to mcginnisucalgary.ca. Many thanks for your help!

-Martha 
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Message 2: London English auxiliary omission

Date: Tue, 30 Mar 2004 06:32:44 -0500 (EST)
From: Sebastian Rasinger <S.Rasingersussex.ac.uk>
Subject: London English auxiliary omission

Is anyone aware of work done on the omission of auxiliary verbs in
London/Southeast England English, particularly in present progressive
constructions such as ''They helping us'' or ''We running''? It can be
frequently heard, but literature seems non-existent. Any advice most
gratefully received. Will post summary. Many thanks in advance.

Subject-Language: English; Code: ENG 
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