LINGUIST List 15.1168

Sat Apr 10 2004

Qs: Lenition/Melodic Loss; Comparative Typology

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Directory

  1. Attila Starcevic, Lenition
  2. Yuri Tambovtsev, comparative typology of sound pictures of world languages

Message 1: Lenition

Date: Fri, 9 Apr 2004 07:24:24 -0400 (EDT)
From: Attila Starcevic <mazanydellahotmail.com>
Subject: Lenition

Dear Linguists,

My general topic of research has been the question of whether it could
be possible to extend the notion of lenition (generally regarded to be
capturable in terms of melodic loss) to melodic 'gain'. In other
words, whereas a change of the d > t type is generally regarded to
exemplify the loss of melodic material, here 'voice', for example,
what label (from this perspective) could be given to a t going to d in
intervocalic positions, for example? If one regards lenition to be
loss of material, is this fortition then? If this should be fortition,
what label could be attached then to the following changes t > ?, j >
dz, s > th, etc. Should one make a difference (and how) between
melodic loss/gain vs. sonority hierarchy vs. structural position of
the change (intervocalic, etc.)? SO, can lenition be loss and gain at
the same time?

Is there any explicit literature (of any conviction) on this subject?
(I would be exceedingly grateful for any hints on this!).
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Message 2: comparative typology of sound pictures of world languages

Date: Thu, 8 Apr 2004 20:13:17 +0600
From: Yuri Tambovtsev <yutambmail.cis.ru>
Subject: comparative typology of sound pictures of world languages

Dear colleagues, I deal with comparing the sound pictures of world 
languages. I have studied so far 156 world languages from the point of 
view of occurrence of phonemes in their sound chains. I guess it can be 
called the typological study. This is why, I'm particularly interested 
how linguists and other scholars understand typology. Can one call my 
study the "comparative typology"? What is typology as it is? Looking 
forward to hearing from you soon to yutambhotmail.com 

Remain yours most sincerely 
Yuri Tambovtsev 
yutambhotmail.com20

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