LINGUIST List 15.1520

Thu May 13 2004

Calls: Syntax/Germany; Translation/UK

Editor for this issue: Marie Klopfenstein <marielinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. rvogel, Workshop on Empirical Syntax / Workshop on Optimality Theoretic Syntax 8
  2. ian.kemble, 4th Portsmouth Translation Conference

Message 1: Workshop on Empirical Syntax / Workshop on Optimality Theoretic Syntax 8

Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 05:02:39 -0400 (EDT)
From: rvogel <rvogelling.uni-potsdam.de>
Subject: Workshop on Empirical Syntax / Workshop on Optimality Theoretic Syntax 8


Workshop on Empirical Syntax / Workshop on Optimality Theoretic Syntax 8
Short Title: WOTS8

Date: 27-Aug-2004 - 29-Aug-2004 
Location: Berlin, Germany 
Contact: Ralf Vogel 
Contact Email: rvogelling.uni-potsdam.de

Linguistic Sub-field: Syntax 
Call Deadline: 06-Jun-2004 

Meeting Description:

Workshop on Empirical Syntax / Workshop on Optimality Theoretic Syntax
8 (WOTS8)

The Zentrum f''ur Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft (ZAS), and the
Institute of Linguistics, University of Potsdam, invite abstract
submissions for a

Workshop on Empirical Syntax / 
Workshop on Optimality Theoretic Syntax 8 (WOTS8)

to beld on August, 27-29,
at the ZAS, Berlin

Description:

In generative grammar, 'descriptive adequacy' is understood as a
requirement on the empirical validity of a theory of grammar: the
grammar postulated for a given language should derive exactly the set
of all grammatical sentences in that language. This presupposes the
existence of a safe empirical method to determine this set of
grammatical sentences. Such a method does not exist up to now, and its
development faces a number of serious problems. This fact, however,
has mostly been ignored by generative syntacticians who, when they
determine the grammaticality status of a sentence, usually rely on
their own intuitions and what they consider to be the common sense in
a speech community.

However, if one takes the demand of descriptive adequacy seriously,
this situation should not remain as it is. Some attempts in this
direction have been undertaken (Sch''utze 1996, Cowart 1997, a.o.),
but their influence on theories and practice in generative syntax seem
marginal at best.

One problem that immediately arises is that empirical methods let
grammaticality appear more like a continuum than like a
dichotomy. Every attempt to divide this continuum at a particular
point in order to reach the grammatical/ungrammatical distinction
appears to be arbitrary, and does not seem to be justifiable on
independent grounds. But this calls the concept of grammaticality
itself into question, and with it the whole empirical basis of the
generative approach.

In this workshop, we want to try and bring theoretical and empirical
syntax closer together. One focus of interest are attempts within
Optimality Theory, especially in its stochastic variant, but the
workshop is aimed to be broader in its theoretical scope. We invite
submissions for presentations of about 50 minutes (including
discussion) that present actual work, and deal with at least one of
the following questions:

1. How does a model of syntax have to be interpreted in order to
 derive predictions for quantitative empirical studies?

2. How do the results of empirical studies have to be interpreted in
 order to draw conclusions for the nature of the 
 underlying grammar?

3. How do current models of syntax have to be modified or extended in
 order to reflect the results of empirical studies?

Abstracts for presentations should be sent electronically to Yukiko
Morimoto (morimotozas.gwz-berlin.de) and/or Ralf Vogel
(rvogelling.uni-potsdam.de). The deadline for submission of abstracts
is June, 6, 2004.

Notification of acceptance: June, 30, 2004. 

For further information please contact Yukiko Morimoto or Ralf Vogel:

morimotozas.gwz-berlin.de
rvogelling.uni-potsdam.de



Program Committee:

Gisbert Fanselow (Potsdam University)
Manfred Krifka (Humboldt University Berlin, ZAS)
Gerhard J''ager (Potsdam University, ZAS)
Yukiko Morimoto (ZAS)
Ralf Vogel (Potsdam University) 
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Message 2: 4th Portsmouth Translation Conference

Date: Wed, 12 May 2004 12:06:58 -0400 (EDT)
From: ian.kemble <ian.kembleport.ac.uk>
Subject: 4th Portsmouth Translation Conference


4th Portsmouth Translation Conference

Date: 13-Nov-2004 - 13-Nov-2004
Location: Portsmouth, Hampshire, United Kingdom
Contact: Ian Kemble
Contact Email: ian.kembleport.ac.uk 
Meeting URL: http://www.port.ac.uk/translationconference 

Linguistic Sub-field: Translation 
Call Deadline: 30-Jul-2004 

Meeting Description:

All areas of life are influenced by norms to a greater or lesser
extent, and this is no less true of translation. The conference will
aim to bring together the various actors in the profession and invite
them to consider what the norms of the profession are and to reflect
on the extent to which the norms are changing. Contributions are
invited with this CALL FOR PAPERS from parties actively involved in
translation or interpreting.

School of Languages and Area Studies
University of Portsmouth
Portsmouth, UK

CALL FOR PAPERS

The Fourth Portsmouth Translation Conference will take place at the
School of Languages and Area Studies, University of Portsmouth, King
Henry I Street, Portsmouth, PO1 2DZ, UK, on:

Saturday, 13th November 2004

TRANSLATION NORMS - WHAT IS 'NORMAL' IN THE TRANSLATION PROFESSION?

KEYNOTE SPEAKER: ANDREW CHESTERMAN


All areas of life are influenced by norms to a greater or lesser
extent, and this is no less true of translation. The conference will
aim to bring together the various actors in the profession and invite
them to consider what the norms of the profession are and to reflect
on the extent to which the norms are changing. Contributions are
invited with this CALL FOR PAPERS from parties actively involved in
translation or interpreting. Suggestions for contributions can be
found below.

Should you wish to contribute please submit a 200-300 word abstract by
31st July 2004. As well as an outline of the paper, the abstract
should include the author's name, affiliation and contact address
(including email and fax number).

Proceedings will be produced subsequent to the conference.

Please contact: 

Ian Kemble
School of Languages and Area Studies
Park Building
King Henry I Street
Portsmouth PO1 2DZ

Tel: ++44 (0)23 9284 6060
Fax: ++44 (0)23 9284 6040
Website: http://www.port.ac.uk/translationconference
Email: ian.kembleport.ac.uk

SUGGESTIONS FOR CONTRIBUTIONS

-The individual translator and the notion of norms

-Translation agencies: to what extent are the norms changing?

-Translation companies: what sort of norms define their activities?

-Large organisations: do they exert a normative influence on their
translators.

-To what extent does the client define the norms of the profession?

-Norm-breaking in translation - the translator's licence to break
established norms

-Are there universal translation norms?

-Stylistic norms: what are they and how do they operate?

-Socio-cultural norms in receiving cultures/languages (TL) that guide
translator behaviour and strategies

-New developments affecting the professional status of translators
(IOL Charter, CEN standards).

-Starting up in translation: is there a normal route to success?

-Translator training: do norms exist here and, if not, should they
exist?


Conference Organiser
ian.kembleport.ac.uk

















 

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