LINGUIST List 15.1710

Thu Jun 3 2004

Qs: Ling Teaching Philosophy/Phonetic Variation

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Directory

  1. Jo Mackiewicz, Philosophies for Teaching Intro to Linguistics
  2. Elyshia Elyshia elyshia989, Web Phonetic Variation

Message 1: Philosophies for Teaching Intro to Linguistics

Date: Wed, 2 Jun 2004 14:02:12 -0400 (EDT)
From: Jo Mackiewicz <jmackiewd.umn.edu>
Subject: Philosophies for Teaching Intro to Linguistics

Dear Colleagues:

I am studying introductory courses to linguistics (e.g., Introduction
to Linguistics or Introduction to Language). I am interested in
courses from universities across Carnegie classifications, including
Research Extensive, Research Intensive, and Masters I universities.

Besides studying the syllabi and textbooks that instructors use, I
would like to study instructors philosophies for teaching
introductory linguistics courses.

Many of us write statements of our teaching philosophy for job
applications, awards, and tenure review. I am hoping that you will be
willing to share your teaching philosophy for teaching linguistics,
especially introduction to linguistics courses, with me.

If you would be willing to send your teaching philosophy statement to
me, you can send it to me by email at jmackiewd.umn.edu. Or, you can
send it by snail mail to Dr. Jo Mackiewicz, Composition Department and
Linguistics Program, University of Minnesota Duluth, Duluth,
Minnesota, 55812, USA.

If you have any questions, please contact me by email at
jmackiewd.umn.edu.

Thank you so much for considering my request,
Jo
www.d.umn.edu/~jmackiew 
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Message 2: Web Phonetic Variation

Date: Thu, 3 Jun 2004 13:45:37 -0400 (EDT)
From: Elyshia Elyshia elyshia989 <Elyshia>
Subject: Web Phonetic Variation


Dear Sirs,

I am going to do a MA dissertation about investigating phonetic
variation of language use in internet chatting room and mobile phone
text message(SMS). The purpose of this dissertation is to propose
possible development of internet language in terms of phonetics.

Could you please have a look on these rules below I categorized for
the variation of internet language use.

1. Pronunciation as letters or numbers: e.g. are-->r, you-->u,
before-->b4... etc.
2. Consonant omission: e.g. what-->wat, talking-->talkin.
3. Weak form: e.g. don't know--> dunno, out to-> outta.
4. sharing similar pronunciation of letter: e.g. love--> luv,
cause--> cuz, something--> sumthin.
5. Vowel omission: e.g. within-->withn, from-->frm, should-->shld.

May I have your comments on these categorized rules and your
recommendation about any reference I can refer to?

I appreciate your kindly reply.

Best regards

Elyshia
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