LINGUIST List 15.1872

Mon Jun 21 2004

Qs: Devoicing/Greek; Aspiration/English

Editor for this issue: Andrea Berez <andrealinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Yuri Tambovtsev, Devoicing at the End of the Modern and Old Greek Word?
  2. Katalin Balogne Berces, Aspiration in English sCC Clusters

Message 1: Devoicing at the End of the Modern and Old Greek Word?

Date: Sun, 20 Jun 2004 22:52:13 +0600
From: Yuri Tambovtsev <yutambmail.cis.ru>
Subject: Devoicing at the End of the Modern and Old Greek Word?




Dear LinguistList colleagues,

could you tell me if voiced consonants such as "b, d, g", etc. are
devoiced at the end of the Greek word into something like "p, t, k, x"
etc. in modern Greek and in Old Greek? I'd like to compute the
frequency of occurrence of Greek phonemes&nbsp;and to compare the
frequencies in&nbsp;modern and Old Greek.

Looking forward to hearing from you soon to yutambhotmail.com

Remain yours sincerely 
Yuri Tambovtsev
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Message 2: Aspiration in English sCC Clusters

Date: Thu, 17 Jun 2004 15:46:42 -0400 (EDT)
From: Katalin Balogne Berces <bbkatiyahoo.com>
Subject: Aspiration in English sCC Clusters

Dear Linguists,

I need some data about aspiration in English. It's well-known that
voiceless plosives are strongly aspirated at the beginning of stressed
syllables and word-initially as in 'pit', and that they are not
aspirated if preceded by /s/ as in 'spit'. Some authors also attribute
the devoicedness of following sonorants to this aspiration, as in
'trip'. My question is: is the plosive aspirated, and/or the following
sonorant devoiced in sCC clusters, as in 'stray, splash, skew,
squash'? I have only found very few data, and even those are
contradictory. Is it possible that there is some dialectal variation
here? Remarks/intuitions of any kind are welcome! 

Thanks in advance,
Katalin Balogne Berces

Subject-Language: English; Code: ENG 
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