LINGUIST List 15.1993

Tue Jul 6 2004

Confs: Lang Description/London, UK

Editor for this issue: Andrea Berez <andrealinguistlist.org>


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  1. fl2, BAAL colloquium 'Joint efforts, shared benefits - advances in methodology,good practice and theory building for and through language documentation'

Message 1: BAAL colloquium 'Joint efforts, shared benefits - advances in methodology,good practice and theory building for and through language documentation'

Date: Thu, 1 Jul 2004 11:36:42 -0400 (EDT)
From: fl2 <fl2soas.ac.uk>
Subject: BAAL colloquium 'Joint efforts, shared benefits - advances in methodology,good practice and theory building for and through language documentation'

BAAL colloquium 'Joint efforts, shared benefits - advances in
methodology,good practice and theory building for and through language
documentation'

Short Title: BAAL colloquium 

Date: 10-Sep-2004 - 10-Sep-2004
Location: London, United Kingdom
Contact: Friederike Luepke
Contact Email: fl2soas.ac.uk 
Meeting URL: http://www.baal-conference.org.uk/index2.html 

Linguistic Sub-field: Applied Linguistics ,Language Description
,Linguistic Theories ,Psycholinguistics ,Text/Corpus Linguistics
,Anthropological Linguistics ,Language Acquisition


Meeting Description:

Language documentation is a relatively new field of linguistics, whose
standards are still emerging. The colloquium will engage colleagues
from three fields of applied linguistics in an exchange with
documentary linguists on the issues of methodology, good practice, and
theory building in relation to language documentation. We will
exchange with scholars in anthropology and ethnography ideas about
what kinds of data they would like to see included in a documentation
in order to allow an appraisal of cultural and social practices based
on collected audio and video data. We will discuss with corpus
linguists what tools we can use in order to manage and analyse
corpora, and what research questions small field-based corpora can
answer. Finally, we will engage with psycholinguists and language
learning researchers on what kind of research questions we could
answer through the use of stimuli and experiments, and how and to what
degree we could document minority learner languages.

Programme

An anthropologist's suggestions for co-operative efforts between
ethnographers and linguists working in small-scale societies - Mark
Jamieson, Centro de Investigaciones y Documentacion de la Costa
Atlantica (CIDCA), Nicaragua

Advances in linguistic theory issues through language documentation
and psycholinguistic methodology: contributions from South-American
languages - Raquel Guirardello-Damian, Max Planck Institute for
Psycholinguistics Nijmegen/Museu Em´┐Żlio Goeldi/University of Bristol

The use of corpora in the study of collocation and semantic prosody,
exemplified through corpus data from English and Mandarin Chinese -
Tony McEnery and Richard Xiao, Department of Linguistics and Modern
English Language Lancaster University

An overview of the design and encoding principles underlying the
British National Corpus project and how thy can be adapted to
field-based corpora - Lou Burnard, Oxford University Computing
Services

The possible contributions of field-based corpora to syntactic theory,
corpus linguistics, sociolinguistics, and anthropological and applied
linguistics - Friederike Luepke, Endangered Languages Academic
Programme, SOAS

The use of elicitation games in corpus studies - Sonja Eisenbeiss,
Department of Language and Linguistics, University of Essex, and Ayumi
Matsuo, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics Nijmegen


Three reasons to record speech-accompanying gestures when documenting
an endangered language - Sotaro Kita, Department of Experimental
Psychology, University of Bristol
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