LINGUIST List 15.207

Tue Jan 20 2004

Calls: Computational Ling/Spain; Computational Ling

Editor for this issue: Andrea Berez <andrealinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Rada Mihalcea rada, ACL-04 3rd International Workshop on the Evaluation of Systems for the Semantic Analysis of Text
  2. dbyron, ACL04 Workshop on Discourse Annotation

Message 1: ACL-04 3rd International Workshop on the Evaluation of Systems for the Semantic Analysis of Text

Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 16:42:42 -0500 (EST)
From: Rada Mihalcea rada <Rada>
Subject: ACL-04 3rd International Workshop on the Evaluation of Systems for the Semantic Analysis of Text

ACL-04 3rd International Workshop on the Evaluation of Systems for the
Semantic Analysis of Text
Date: 25-Jul-2004 - 26-Jul-2004
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Conference URL: http://www.senseval.org/senseval3
Call Deadline: 01-Mar-2004

Linguistic Subfield: Computational Linguistics


Meeting Description:

The main purpose of this workshop is to analyze and discuss the
results of systems participating in the Senseval-3 evaluations, to be
held in March-April 2004. Fourteen different tasks are planned for
Senseval-3, to conduct evaluations of systems that perform automatic
semantic analysis of text, including: word sense disambiguation for
various languages, identification of semantic roles, logic forms,
multilingual annotations, subcategorization acquisition.

This is an advance notice of the evaluation exercise and workshop.
Registration for the evaluation will open in February (watch the
website for updates). Papers will be accepted from participants only.


CALL FOR PARTICIPATION IN SENSEVAL-3 EVALUATIONS

SENSEVAL-3 Third International Workshop on the Evaluation of Systems
for the Semantic Analysis of Text

An ACL-2004 Workshop
Barcelona, Spain
July 25-26, 2004

http://www.senseval.org/senseval3


The main purpose of this workshop is to analyze and discuss the
results of systems participating in the Senseval-3 evaluations, to be
held in March-April 2004. Fourteen different tasks are planned for
Senseval-3, to conduct evaluations of systems that perform automatic
semantic analysis of text, including: word sense disambiguation for
various languages, identification of semantic roles, logic forms,
multilingual annotations, subcategorization acquisition.

This is an advance notice of the evaluation exercise and workshop.
Registration for the evaluation will open in February (watch the
website for updates). Papers will be accepted from participants only.


[BACKGROUND]

There are now many computer systems that do automatic semantic
analysis of text. The purpose of Senseval is to evaluate the strengths
and weaknesses of such systems with respect to different words,
relations, types of texts, different varieties of language, and
different languages.

This workshop is a follow-up to Senseval-1 and Senseval-2. Senseval-1
took place in the summer of 1998 for English, French, and Italian,
culminating in a workshop held at Herstmonceux Castle, Sussex, England
on September 2-4. Senseval-2 took place in the summer of 2001, and
was followed by a workshop held in July 2001 in Toulouse, in
conjunction with ACL-2001. Senseval-2 included tasks for Basque,
Chinese, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Estonian, Italian, Japanese,
Korean, Spanish, Swedish.


[TASKS]

The following tasks are planned for Senseval-3 (see webpage for a
description of each task):


1. English all words
2. Italian all words
3. Basque lexical sample
4. Catalan lexical sample
5. Chinese lexical sample
6. English lexical sample
7. Italian lexical sample
8. Romanian lexical sample
9. Spanish lexical sample
10. Automatic subcategorization acquisition
11. Multilingual lexical sample
12. WSD of WordNet glosses
13. Semantic Roles
14. Logic Forms


This 2-day workshop will consist of several Senseval-3 task and system
presentations, including analyses of results obtained during the
evaluations, with comparisons across different systems, techniques,
and languages. We also plan for two panels on (1) the interaction
between systems for semantic analysis of text and other NLP
applications, and (2) planning Senseval-4.


[SUBMISSION FORMAT]

Submissions will consist of refereed papers describing the Senseval-3
tasks and participating systems:
- one paper for each task, limited to four pages
- one paper for each participating team, limited to four pages for the
first task, and one extra page for each additional task Papers will
have to follow the ACL 2004 formatting guidelines. Submissions will
be entered via the Senseval-3 website.


[IMPORTANT DATES]

Registration February
Evaluations March - April
Deadline for paper submissions April 20
Deadline for camera-ready papers May 18
Workshop July 25-26

[ORGANIZING COMMITTEE]

Phil Edmonds, Sharp Laboratories of Europe
Rada Mihalcea, University of North Texas


[PROGRAM COMMITTEE]

Eneko Agirre, University of the Basque Country
Rebecca Bruce, University of North Carolina at Asheville
Nicoletta Calzolari, ILC-CNR, Pisa
Tim Chklovski, Information Sciences Institute
Massimiliano Ciaramita, Brown University
Silviu Cucerzan, Microsoft Research
Walter Daelemans, University of Antwerp
Florentina Hristea, University of Bucharest
Nancy Ide, Vassar College
Diana Inkpen, University of Ottawa
Adam Kilgarriff, University of Brighton
Dimitrios Kokkinakis, Goteborg University
Anna Korhonen, University of Cambridge
Robert Krovetz, Teoma
Sadao Kurohashi, The University of Kyoto
Dekang Lin, University of Alberta
Ken Litkowski, CL Research
PengYuan Liu, Harbin Institute of Technology
Bernardo Magnini, ITC-IRST, Trento
Lluis Marquez, University of Catalunya
Diana McCarthy, University of Sussex
Vivi Nastase, University of Ottawa
Hwee Tou Ng, National University of Singapore
Martha Palmer, University of Pennsylvania
Patrick Pantel, Information Sciences Institute
Ted Pedersen, University of Minnesota, Duluth
Judita Preiss, University of Cambridge
Amruta Purandare, University of Minnesota, Duluth
German Rigau, University of the Basque Country
Vasile Rus, Indiana University South-Bend
Charles Schafer, John Hopkins University
Carlo Strapparava, ITC-IRST, Trento
Dan Tufis, Romanian Academy
Cynthia Thompson, University of Utah
Paola Velardi, ''La Sapienza'', Rome
Janyce Wiebe, University of Pittsburgh
David Yarowsky, John Hopkins University
Deniz Yuret, Koc University
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Message 2: ACL04 Workshop on Discourse Annotation

Date: Tue, 20 Jan 2004 14:42:11 -0500 (EST)
From: dbyron <dbyroncis.ohio-state.edu>
Subject: ACL04 Workshop on Discourse Annotation

ACL04 Workshop: Discourse Annotation 

Date: 25-Jul-2004 - 26-Jul-2004
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Contact: Bonnie Webber
Contact Email: bonnieinf.ed.ac.uk 
Meeting URL: http://www.cllt.osu.edu/dbyron/acl04 

Linguistic Sub-field: Computational Linguistics 
Call Deadline: 22-Mar-2004 

Meeting Description:

ACL04 Workshop: Discourse Annotation Call for Papers Call for Papers
Discourse Annotation

A Workshop in conjunction with ACL'04 in Barcelona, Spain

Workshop date: July 25-26, 2004
Full paper submissions due: March 22, 2004 
Workshop website: http://www.cllt.osu.edu/dbyron/acl04

WORKSHOP OVERVIEW:

Advances in language technology draw on a combination of annotated
empirical data and linguistic theory. The richer the annotation, the
more that can potentially be learned and applied to unseen data. Thus
the Penn TreeBank (PTB), with its part-of-speech (POS) tags and
syntactic annotation, has been more useful than corpora annotated for
POS-tags alone, and PropBank, in which PTB is annotated with
predicate-argument relations, will be useful for more applications
than the PTB alone.

Two gross features of PTB and PropBank are that they annotate
sentence/clause-level features and that they were undertaken with
communal agreement (albeit somewhat contentious at first). Similar,
largely communal projects have been undertaken for dialogue
annotation, including MATE (now NITE).

Discourse annotation (in contrast with sentence-level annotation) has
taken a somewhat different course. While an early communal effort
(DRI) to annotate discourse structure according to a consensus
framework failed to achieve its goal, recognition remained of the
value of discourse annotated corpora. The result has been that diverse
grass-roots efforts have been producing individual corpora annotated
for a wide variety of phenomena such as

 - referring/attributive expressions and coreference;
 - spatial/temporal expressions and spatial/temporal relations;
 - other anaphoric and/or elliptic expressions and their discourse
 dependencies;
 - discourse units and their relations to one another;
 - information structure themes and the themes/rhemes that license
 them;
 - discourse connectives and what they connect;
 - contexts of interpretation;
 - cognitive accessibility scales (e.g. animacy);
 - types of speech (direct, indirect, free indirect).

Groups involved in these efforts appear to be using (or planning to
use) these corpora for a range of applications that include: empirical
testing of theoretical claims/hypotheses; supporting second-language
acquisition of discourse-sensitive linguistic devices; training
resolution procedures for co-referring expressions or other anaphors,
that can be used in annotating additional texts or in supporting
technologies such as information extraction, question answering,
summarization, and/or text generation; training discourse parsers that
can be used for annotating additional texts or for reducing the amount
of manual effort needed in the process; and probabilistic sentence and
text realization.

The workshop is neutral as to whether consensus annotation is possible
for every type of discourse phenomenon. Its aims are rather to:

 - bring a fuller range of discourse annotation activity to the
 attention of researchers working on discourse phenomena and their
 usefulness for language technologies;

 - highlight tools used in the annotation process or used to display
 or further analyse the results of annotation;

 - discuss obstacles to some (all?) forms of discourse-level
 annotation, such as the greater subjectivity that seems involved
 in making judgments related to, for example, bracketting and
 labelling;

 - identify gaps in this work (e.g., in the range of genre being
 annotated);

 - stimulate researchers with respect to the uses other researchers
 are putting their data to;

 - discuss (in small groups and in feedback sessions) whether we
 already have, or could together create, a significantly large,
 reusable corpus (or set of corpora) annotated for multiple
 discourse and sentence-level phenomena, as a much richer basis
 for both assessing theories and building better tools.

With these aims in mind, we solicit papers on:

 - discourse annotation projects (in any language);
 - uses made of discourse annotated corpora, alone or together
 with other forms of annotation;
 - tools for discourse annotation (e.g., for assisting manual
 annotation or for (semi-)automating the process) or for analysing
 discourse annotated data;
 - tools for integrating layers of annotation (different types of 
 word-, sentence-, and discourse-level markup);
 - requirements for annotated corpora from the perspective of
 computational linguistics (e.g., vis-a-vis data sharing,
 comparison, integration/alignment, etc.)
 - experiments with integrating and exploiting different layers of 
 annotation (from word to discourse level)

As well as for presentation, the papers will be used for structuring
the above-mentioned small group discussions and feedback sessions.

Format for Submissions

Submissions are limited to original, unpublished work. Submissions
must use the 2-column ACL latex style or Microsoft Word style (see
submission style files at
http://www.acl2004.org/aclstyles/style.html). Paper submissions
should consist of a full paper (up to 8 pages in length, including
references, with a minimum font size of 10 point). Papers outside the
specified length are subject to be rejected without review. The paper
should be written in English.

Submission Questions

Please send submission questions to the co-chairs:

 bonnieinf.ed.ac.uk
 dbyroncis.ohio-state.edu


Submission Procedure

Electronic submission only: send the pdf (preferred), postscript, or
MS Word form of your submission to: Donna Byron
(dbyroncis.ohio-state.edu). The Subject line should be ''ACL2004
WORKSHOP PAPER SUBMISSION''.

N.B. If you use any special fonts, please include them with your PDF
submission. Otherwise reviewers may have unnecessary problems with
printing.

Deadlines:

Paper submission deadline: Mar 22, 2004
Notification of acceptance for papers: April 30, 2004
Camera ready papers due: May 24, 2004
Workshop date: Jul 25, 2004

PROGRAMME COMMITTEE

Bonnie Webber, University of Edinburgh (co-chair)
Donna Byron, Ohio State University (co-chair)

Steven Bird, Melbourne University
Liesbeth Degand, University of Louvain
Eva Hajicova, Charles University
Aravind Joshi, University of Pennsylvania
Andrew Kehler, UC San Diego
Daniel Marcu, ISI
Katja Markert, Leeds University
Malvina Nissim, Edinburgh University
Livia Polanyi, FXPAL
Frank Schilder, University of Hamburg
Andrea Setzer, Sheffield University
Wilbert Spooren, Free University of Amsterdam
Manfred Stede, University of Potsdam
Michael Strube, EML Research, Heidelberg
Martin van den Berg, FXPAL
Annie Zaenen, PARC


CONTACT INFORMATION:

Professor Bonnie Webber
School of Informatics
University of Edinburgh
2 Buccleuch Place
Edinburgh EH8 9LW
UK
email: bonnieinf.ed.ac.uk
phone: +44 131 650 4190
fax: +44 131 650 4587

Professor Donna Byron
Department of Computer and Information Science
The Ohio State University
395 Dreese Laboratory
2015 Neil Avenue
Columbus, Ohio 43210 
USA
email: dbyroncis.ohio-state.edu 
phone: 614-292-6370
fax: 614-292-2911 
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